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Add External HD

Posted on 2000-01-26
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I would like to add a additional to Unix server
Any procedure I need to take?
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Question by:logout
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by:geoff2000
ID: 2390815

su to root. type:

`su -`
`touch /reconfigure`

Shutdown the machine. Turn off all power.

Add disk and make sure that the disks target number is unique from other devices.

Boot up and then create the disk slices and label the disks using format. If you need help doing this let me know. But get the disk attached first
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by:geoff2000
ID: 2390831

su to root. type:

`su -`
`touch /reconfigure`

Shutdown the machine. Turn off all power.

Add disk and make sure that the disks target number is unique from other devices.

Boot up and then create the disk slices and label the disks using format. If you need help doing this let me know. But get the disk attached first
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by:kawin
ID: 2391573
What type of your unix? Linux, Solaris, FreeBSD. ?

Step that geoff2000 told is for Solaris only!!
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by:nba
ID: 2391584
Solaris..
would you give the command?
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by:filiep
ID: 2392680
If you are using Solaris, you can to the following (as root):

Use teh follow command for going to the OK prompt:    sync;sync;halt

Once you are at the OK prompt you can type probe-scsi to check if you see the new HD. If so type reboot -r
Once the system is up you should use the format command for making the slices.
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jlevie earned 100 total points
ID: 2395062
The prior comments are correct as far as they go, but may not be enough information, which I'll try to correct.

First you have to physically add the drive. If the system is an Ultra 5 or 10 you'll be adding a second internal EIDE drive unless an optional SCSI controller has already been installed in the system. If you're adding to an optional SCSI controller, see below. Note that Ultra 5 & 10's can't use an EIDE drive larger than 9GB until Solaris 8 is generally available. On the EIDE implementations that Sun is using in the 5 & 10's the drives are normally configured for "cable select". If the drive to be added can't do cable select, you'll have to change the existing drive to be a Master and set the second drive to be slave.

The SCSI based Suns, anything other than an Ultra 5 or 10, can use internal or external drives . Just make sure when adding a drive that you select an unused SCSI target and that you obey all the rules for cabling and termination. You'll need to consult the hardware documentation for your system to find out what the internal drive bay(s) use for SCSI ID's so you won't clash.

When the drive has been physically added, you can check to see that it's available by doing a probe-scsi (for on-board SCSI-controllers) or probe-scsi-all on later Suns with additional SCSI controllers from the boot prompt (power on and hit "Stop-A"). If you need to do a probe-scsi-all on an Ultra, you'll have to set the boot prom not to auto boot, do a reset, then do a probe-scsi-all. If you don't the box will lock up hard, requiring a power cycle to clear.

If you can see the drive from the prom environment, you'll need to do a "reconfiguration boot" (boot -r from the prom prompt) or boot the system, execute "touch /reconfigure" and reboot.
Note that if the drive has never before been installed on a Sun you'll see an error message during boot complaining about a "Bad magic number". This just means that the system saw the drive and couldn't find a Sun label.

Once the "reconfiguration boot" has been done, you need to run format and create partitions on the drive and label it. When you run format, the disk selection menu will tell you where the system "sees" the drive. Take note of the device string (something like c0t0d0, c1t1d0, etc) as you'll need it next.

When the drive has been partitioned & labled, the next step is to create a UFS file system on each partition. If, for example, you created two partitions (slice 0 & 1), on a drive with id c0t2d0 you'd make the filesystems by executing:

# newfs /dev/rdsk/c0t2d0s0
# newfs /dev/rdsk/c0t2d0s1

At this point you can mount the drive manually:

# mkdir /new-fs1
# mount /dev/dsk/c2d0s0 /new-fs1
# mkdir /new-fs2
# mount /dev/dsk/c2t0d0s1 /new-fs2

and copy data to the new file systems, or add entries to /etc/vfstab to have the slices mounted at boot time.
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