Where to get ACPI.SYS or "Win98 (1st edition) keeps freezing at shutdown"

I'm trying to install Win98 (1st edition) on a home-built PC, which worked just fine under Win95 OSR2.
My PC (ASUS P55T2P4 with K6-233) matches description of one of the systems prone to ACPI related shutdown problems, listed in MS Knowledge Base article Q196008. The article suggests getting proper ACPI.SYS file as a solution (attempts to disable/enable Fast Shutdown didn't help).
Where cen I get ACPI.SYS file version 4.10.2000 dated 11/23/98?
Thanx
BSergeevAsked:
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1cellCommented:
go to start | run and type SFC

use the option which lets you extract one file from the CD

look in base5.cab
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1cellCommented:
oops, sorry, you haven't installed 98 yet so you wil have to manually extract it from the cd.  here's some how to.

Extracting Windows Files from an Unknown Cabinet File
-----------------------------------------------------
 
Extracting a Single File:
 
If you do not know which cabinet file contains the Windows file you want to
extract, use the following command to search all the cabinet files in sequential order and then extract the file once it is found:
 
   extract /a <cabinet> <filename> /l <destination>
 
For example, to extract the Unidrv.dll file from disks in drive A into the
Windows\System folder on drive C, use the following command:
 
   extract /a a:\win95_02.cab unidrv.dll /l c:\windows\system
 
The /a switch causes the Extract tool to search all the cabinet files starting
with the first cabinet file mentioned on the command line (in this example,
Win95_02.cab). Insert the disk containing the first cabinet file mentioned in
the appropriate disk drive. You will be prompted to insert additional disks as
they are needed. If you are extracting from a CD-ROM you must modify the
<cabinet> parameter accordingly to reflect the actual location of the
cabinet files.
 
NOTE: In Windows 98, you should use the Base4.cab file in command lines with the /a parameter.
 
If the Extract tool cannot find the specified Windows 95 file in any of the
cabinet files, the file may be located in the Mini.cab, Precopy1.cab, or
Precopy2.cab cabinet file. Use the following two commands to search these
cabinet files:
 
 - extract /a a:\precopy1.cab <filename> /l <destination>
 
 - extract a:\mini.cab <filename> /l <destination>
 
NOTE: The first command searches the Precopy1.cab and the Precopy2.cab cabinet files. The second command searches the Mini.cab cabinet file. If you are extracting from a CD-ROM, you must modify the <cabinet> parameter in these commands accordingly.
 
Extracting Multiple Files:
 
To extract multiple files, use the same syntax as above, but use a wildcard
designation for the <filename> parameter. For example, to extract all the
Windows 95 files with a .txt extension from disks in drive A to the Windows
folder on drive C, use the following command:
 
   extract /a a:\win95_02.cab *.txt /l c:\windows
 
Note that if you are extracting from a CD-ROM, you must modify the
<cabinet> parameter in this command accordingly.
 
Finding Windows Files
---------------------
 
Finding a Single File:
 
You can use the Extract tool to determine which cabinet file contains a
particular Windows file. When you use this syntax, the Extract tool searches the cabinet files but does not extract the file once it is found:
 
   extract /a /d <cabinet> <filename>
 
For example, to find the Windows 95 Unidrv.dll file, starting with the
Win95_02.cab file, using disks in the A drive, use the following command:
 
   extract /a /d a:\win95_02.cab unidrv.dll
 
Finding Multiple Files:
 
To find multiple files, use the same syntax as above, but use a wildcard
designation for the <filename> parameter. For example, to find all the
Windows 95 files with a .txt extension using disks in the A drive, use the
following command:
 
   extract /a /d a:\win95_02.cab *.txt
 
Extracting Windows Files from a Known Cabinet File
--------------------------------------------------
 
Extracting a Single File:
 
If you know which cabinet file contains the file you want to extract, use the
following syntax to extract the file:
 
   extract <cabinet> <filename> /l <destination>
 
For example, to extract the Windows 95 Unidrv.dll file from the Win95_10.cab file on a disk in drive A to the Windows\System folder on drive C, use the following command:
 
   extract a:\win95_10.cab unidrv.dll /l c:\windows\system
 
Extracting Multiple Files:
 
To extract multiple files from a cabinet file, use the same syntax as above, but use a wildcard designation for the <filename> parameter. For example, to extract all the Windows 95 files that have a .txt extension from the
Win95_06.cab file on a disk in drive A to the Windows folder on drive C, use the following command:
 
   extract a:\win95_06.cab *.txt /l c:\windows\system
 
Listing the Contents of Cabinet Files
-------------------------------------
 
You can use the Extract tool to list the contents of cabinet files without
actually extracting any files. To display the contents of a cabinet file, use
the following syntax:
 
   extract /d <cabinet>
 
To display the contents of all the cabinet files in a cabinet chain, starting
with the specified cabinet file, use the following syntax:
 
   extract /a /d <cabinet>
 
For example, to display the contents of all the Windows 95 cabinet files using disks in drive A, starting with the Win95_02.cab file, use the following
command:
 
   extract /a /d a:\win95_02.cab
 
NOTE: The /a switch causes the Extract tool to list the contents of all the
cabinet files in the cabinet chain, starting with the first cabinet file
mentioned.
 
Copying Cabinet Files to a Hard Disk
------------------------------------
 
Although you cannot make copies of the original Windows 95 floppy disks using the utilities that are included with Windows 95, you can use the Extract tool to copy cabinet files from a CD-ROM or floppy disk to your hard disk. To do so, use the following syntax:
 
   extract /c <cabinet> <destination>
 
For example, to copy the Win95_02.cab file from a disk in drive A to the Windows folder on drive C, use the following command:
 
   extract /c a:\win95_02.cab c:\windows
 
NOTE: You cannot use the /a and /c switches at the same time. Therefore, you cannot copy all the cabinet files using a single command.
 
Other Optional Switches
-----------------------
 
 - Use the /y switch to cause the Extract tool to not prompt you before
   overwriting an existing file. If you use this switch when you are extracting
   a file, any file in the destination folder with the same name as the file you
   are extracting is automatically overwritten.
 
   For example, to extract the Unidrv.dll file from the Win95_02.cab file on a
   disk in drive A to the Windows\System folder on drive C and automatically
   overwrite any existing Unidrv.dll file that is already there, use the
   following command:
 
   extract /y /a a:\win95_02.cab unidrv.dll /l c:\windows\system
 
 - Use the /e switch in place of the "*.*" wildcard designation when you are
   extracting or finding multiple files. For example, to extract all the files
   from the Win95_06.cab file on a disk in drive A to the Windows folder on
   drive C, use either of the following commands:
 
    - extract /e a:\win95_06.cab /l c:\windows
 
    - extract a:\win95_06.cab *.* /l c:\windows
 
For a complete list of the command-line switches for the Extract tool, type
"extract" (without quotation marks) at a command prompt.
 
System File Checker Tool
------------------------
 
Windows 98 includes a System File Checker tool. You can use this tool to verify the integrity of your operating system files, to restore them if they are
damaged, or to extract compressed files from the Windows 98 CD-ROM. To use System File Checker to extract a compressed file from the Windows 98 CD-ROM, follow these steps:
 
1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools,
   and then click System Information.
 
2. On the Tools menu, click System File Checker.
 
3. Click "Extract one file from installation disk," type the name of the file
   you want to extract in the "Specify the system file you would like to
   restore" box, and then click Start.
 
4. In the Restore From box, type the path to the Win98 folder on the Windows 98 CD-ROM, type the destination folder in the Save File In box if necessary, and then click OK.
 
5. Click OK, click OK, and then click Yes when you are prompted to restart your computer.
 
NOTE: If you do not specify a source cabinet (.cab) file in the Restore From box, System File Checker first searches for the file you are extracting in the
specified folder (outside of a cabinet file). System File Checker then searches
all cabinet files, sorted by MS-DOS directory order, in the specified folder.
System File Checker extracts the first instance of the file it finds. To
determine the order in which System File Checker searches cabinet files, type "dir" (without quotation marks) at a command prompt in the specified folder.
 
Using a Windows 98 Startup Disk to Access a CD-ROM and Extract Files
--------------------------------------------------------------------
 
When you install Windows 98, you are prompted to create a Windows 98 Startup disk. A feature included in the Windows 98 Startup disk is support for CD-ROM drives. This may be of benefit if you need to extract a file from the Windows 98 CD-ROM but you are unable to use System File Checker (for example, if your computer does not start properly).
 
NOTE: The Windows 98 Startup disk provides support for most types of CD-ROM drives, including IDE and SCSI CD-ROM drives, but it may not support your particular CD-ROM drive.
 
A Windows 98 Startup disk is required to perform the steps in the following
sections of this article. If you do not have one, you can create one using any
Windows 98-based computer to which you have access. To create a Windows 98 Startup disk, follow these steps:
 
1. Click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double- click
   Add/Remove Programs.
 
2. Click the Startup Disk tab, click Create Disk, and then follow the
   instructions on the screen.
 
How to Start Your Computer with CD-ROM Support and Then Extract Files:
 
To start your computer with CD-ROM support and then extract files, use the
following steps:
 
1. Insert the Windows 98 Startup disk in drive A, and then restart your
   computer.
 
2. When the Microsoft Windows 98 Startup menu appears, choose Start Computer
   With CD-ROM Support.
 
3. Insert the Windows 98 CD-ROM in the CD-ROM drive.
 
4. To extract files at the command prompt, you can use the information provided earlier in this article, or you can use the Extract Command Line Helper tool. To use Extract Command Line Helper, type "ext" (without quotation marks) at the command prompt, and then follow the instructions on the screen.
 
Using the Ext.exe Tool to Extract Files
---------------------------------------
 
The Ext.exe tool builds a command line for the Extract.exe tool. It is located on the Windows 98 Startup disk.
 
To extract a file from a .cab file, run the Ext.exe program from your Windows 98 Startup disk, and follow the instructions on the screen to extract the file you want.
 
Extracting Individual Internet Explorer 4.0 or 4.01 Files
---------------------------------------------------------
 
Internet Explorer 4.0 and 4.01 files are stored in cabinet files within cabinet
files. Individual files are stored in the Ie4_1.cab through Ie4_5.cab files for
Windows 95 and Ie4nt_1.cab through Ie4nt_5.cab files for Windows NT. The
Ie4_1.cab through Ie4_5.cab (and Ie4nt_1.cab through Ie4nt_5.cab) files are included in the Ie4_s1.cab through Ie4_s5.cab (and Ie4nt_s1.cab through Ie4nt_s5.cab) files. To extract individual files, you must first extract the Ie4_<n>.cab (or Ie4nt_<n>.cab) file. To do this, type the following
command at a command prompt, and then press ENTER
 
   extract ie4_s<n>.cab /e
 
where <n> is the number of the cabinet file you want to extract.
 
To extract individual Internet Explorer 4.0 or 4.01 files, follow the appropriate Windows 95 procedure listed earlier in this article using the Ie4_<n>.cab files.
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BSergeevAuthor Commented:
Sorry, your comment does't help me at all.

First, I've already installed 98 and now I'm trying to get rid of the sutdown nightmare (Win98 freezes at every shutdown and starts Scandisk at the next boot).

Second, ACPI.SYS file, which is installed from original Win98 (1st edition) CD, has version 4.10.1998 and is dated 5/11/98. I specifically asked about version 4.10.2000 dated 11/23/98 (please read my original question).

Third, I know how to handle CAB files! I assembled dozens of PCs, installed DOS/Win3/Win95/Win98/WinNT, and was always able to resolve software/hardware conflicts (abundant in MS products). This time, though, I feel pissed off by MS--to get this damned ACPI.SYS fix I have to pay their tech cupport!

Thank you any way. I still hope somebody advise me where to get the updated ACPI.SYS file (as MS Knowledge Base article Q196008 suggests).   ;-)
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1cellCommented:
lets trouble shoot the shut down problem on our own and disregard their advice as there can be many reasons for shut down problems.

1st, will it shut down from safe mode?
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sorgieCommented:
Do you have power management enabled in your Bios. If so have you tried disabling it.
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BSergeevAuthor Commented:
Sorgie,
I tried all combinations of BIOS Power Management enabled/disabled vs. allow/disable Fast Sutdown. None of 4 combinations works!

BTW, I've just recalled that at the very beginning (before I installed video driver), it shut down fine. The video card is Jaton Blaze 3D based on Tridet 985 or something like this chip (yes, I know, pure junk).

Right now, I'll try in turns safe mode and standard VGA video.

Thank you for your support. You guys are incredibly fast!
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1cellCommented:
especially if its a corrupt video driver, it should shut down in safe mode.  if it does shut down in safe mode, could be background apps not closing properly, bad driver, or even a bad sound file playing at windows shutdown
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bchewCommented:
If you have a virus program installed, check the option to scan floppy drive at shutdown.  This works fine in Win95 but will cause Win98 to hang on shutdown.  There is a TechNet article describing this behavior and I can get you the Qnumber if you want it.

Bert
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AnthemCommented:
Bseergv,

Check out this site to help you troubleshoot:

http://www.net-engineer.com/a_shtdwn.htm
http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q238/0/96.ASP

Also check out this site which may help you with the ACPI issue:

http://tcp.ca/gsb/PC/win98tips.htm

I have searched all over the place for the newer version of acpi.sys but came up empty handed.

Maybe you can ask Maxwell ;0),

http://support.microsoft.com/view/pers.asp?id=pass&pg=http%3a%2f%2fask%2esupport%2emicrosoft%2ecom

Hope all works out,

Anthem :0)

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1cellCommented:
what was it?
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