Dual monitors in Linux

I have just purchased SuSE 6.3, and need to know if I would be able to use dual video cards and monitors. I don't see anything mentioned in the manuel.Thanks
mcardiffAsked:
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GregCConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Try http://www.matrox.com
which recently released a Millennium G400 Single Card
that supports dual monitors.  The software portion is
the dual head version of Accelerated-X from  Xi Graphics
http://www.xig.com.
This information comes courtesy of Linux Magazine Feb 2000
issue.  I haven't actually tried this configuration,(only
read about it), but their full article may be found at
www.linux-mag.com.
P.S.  The article also says that you will need  a software
patch at ftp://ftp.xig.com/pub/updates/accelx/multihead/
Hope this helps!
Greg
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jammannCommented:
Currently, I guess you're out of luck. XFree 86 3.3.x (which is the current basic for all Linux distributions does not offer true multihead support. Excerpt from the XF86 FAQ (www.xfree86.org)

Q.A15- Can I use more than one video card in the same machine with XFree86?

Although it is technically possible to use multiple PCI-based SVGA cards in the same machine, none of the servers currently support this.

The VGA16 and Mono servers are both capable of running both a VGA compatible card and a non-VGA compatible monochrome card in the same machine.

For XFree86-4.0 we are working on true multi head support.

The last line gives you some hope, since 4.0 is already in its pre-release stage. The Release-Note for the current snapshot says:

3.5  Multi-head

Some multi-head configurations are supported in this release, primarily with
multiple PCI/AGP cards.  However, this is an area that is still being worked
on, and we expect that the range of configurations for which it works well
will increase in future snapshots.  A configuration that is known to work
well in most cases is multiple (supported) Matrox cards.

One of the main problems is with drivers not sufficiently initialising cards that were not initialised at boot time. Normally only the primary video card gets initialised at boot time.  Some combinations can be made to work better
by changing which card is the primary card (either by using a different PCI
slot, or by changing the system BIOS's preference for the primary card).  We
are investigating options for ``soft-booting'' secondary video cards to deal with this problem, and we've had some very encouraging results.

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mcardiffAuthor Commented:
Thank you very much. I am new to the Linux arena, but with help like this it shouldn't be to hard.

Thanks.
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