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Installing Win95 AND Win NT

Posted on 2000-02-03
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It is possible to install Win95 and WinNT in the very same computer (this is a Pentium III with a disk partition), and to choose which one to run?? If possible, how it is done??? I need the highest level of detail possible...
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Question by:pire
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by:liebrand
ID: 2487038
Install Windows 95 first, and then install Windows NT. It will create a dual boot so every time you computer starts up it will ask you which one you want to start into.

It is very important that you do Windows 95 first and then NT. And make sure you leave the file system intact because if you convert to NTFS, Windows 95 will not work anymore.
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by:abaldwin
ID: 2487239
To elaborate on Liebrand's answer.
I would suggest that you install WIN95 to the first partition and get it all set up and running right.  Then simply drop in the NT Workstation cd while in 95 and install it to the second partition.

That seems simple enough.  The things that you need to keep in mind with dual booting 95/nt is in the program isntallation.

If you install Office 97 for instance and you want it to be accessible from bo OS's.  You need to install it in 95 on its own partition.  Then boot to NT and install it under NT on the NT partition.  Yes you will have it on two places on the hard drive (1 on each partition).  This is about the same for any other software as well.  Most software is somewhat OS's sensative in some areas, especially in the version of DLL files required to run.  You should not just install the software in 95 andd then in NT install it to the same directory on the 95 partition.  This will cause you serious grief.

Usually a dual boot system is booting that way because you want to do certain things in NT such as programming etc, and use the 95 to play games or whatever.

Just letting you know.
Andy
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Expert Comment

by:cooljudson
ID: 2487623
1) Go to an MS-DOS prompt and type FDISK.EXE.  When it asks you to enable large-disk support, change the y to n.
2)  Go into option 4 and see what your file system is.  If your machine has FAT32, you will not be able to install Windows NT.
3)  Back up all valuable information on your hard disks!!!
4)  Go back into fdisk.exe and delete all partitions and reboot. (You can make a boot floppy from the Add/Remove Programs Control Panel!  With Windows 95B or higher, the disk will also contain generic CD-ROM drivers!)
5)  Start with your boot disk in floppy.
6)  Type in fdisk and answer n to large disk question.
7)  Create a new partition of no larger than 2048 MB or 2 GB and set it active.
8)  Restart your computer and format c:
9)  Install Windows 9x as usual.
10) Start your system with NT Startup Disk 1 in floppy.
11) Continue with the installation wizard as usual for Windows NT, except...install your NT files in c:\winnt or somewhere other than c:\windows.
12) Once you have completed your installation of NT and restarted, you will notice a nice little menu asking you to choose your operating system.

Keep me posted:)
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vasu_i earned 400 total points
ID: 2488055
pire,

For installing Win 95 and Win NT you do not even require multiple partitions. Single DOS partition itself can do everything. Lets see how.

First look at what you need to do if you want to dual boot.

Problem No: 1
If you want to dual boot which OS will pass control to the other OS so that it can load. The issue is the OS which is giving control to the other should be already loaded so that it can accept input and pass control to the other OS. But, when the first OS is loaded how can we say the second OS is getting loaded.

What actually happens when you want to load an OS from disk?
Bios instructions will find where is the primary hard disk and simply transfers control to the first sector of the disk (which is Master Boot Record). And now the program need to find where to go and continue to load OS.
Earlier when we are working with our plain DOS or Win 95 the program in the MBR simply finding the active partition in the disk and transferring the control to the partitions first sector where the OS located.
In dual or multi boot systems the MBR is updated with another program which is capable of running a small program, take user input and dynamically decide which one is the active partition. I mean to say that, which one need to be given control so that the OS will continue to load.
Now in case of Win NT a program called BOOT LOADER is installed in the MBR and will decide which OS to be loaded on user input.

The question is, this method requires equal or more number of disk partitions to either dual ot multi boot. That is, if you want to dual boot between two OSs you require a minimum of two partitions in your system.

Here the magic in the combination of Win NT and Win 95, there is no need to install Win 95 in seperate partition. From the BOOL LOADER when you select Win 95 or MS DOS it will load a file called BOOTSECT.DOS as if it was the first sector of the partition. This will work only if you try to dual boot between Win NT and ( Win NT, Win 95 or DOS ). If you want to load Unix or Linux as the other OS it can not load. The reason is the file system will not be able to load Unix. It is possible in NT - NT, NT - 95 or NT - DOS because all these OSs are supporting a common file system to load the OS. Even though Unix supports FAT it will not allow a FAT file system to be a root file system.
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by:hendrik999
ID: 2490736
It is also possible to do it the other way round. If you have NT installed and you want to install Windows 9x.
Keep in mind the previous answers e.g. your fist partitition should be FAT16.
Download http://www.dorsai.org/~dcl/publications/NTLDR_Hacking/boot.zip
This is a small program boot.exe which can read and write bootsectors to and from a file.
Write your current NT bootsector to a file via:
boot /R /DRIVE:C BS bootsect.nt
Install Windows 9x as usual.
Windows 9x is now the only operating system that you can boot.
Write your current 9x bootsector to a file via:
boot /R /DRIVE:C BS bootsect.9x
Copy this file to the root of the C-drive.
Edit boot.ini and insert the following section:
C:\BOOTSECT.W9x="Windows 9x"

Don't forget to remove the hidden and system attributes first via: attrib boot.ini -s -h
And after modifying put it back via:
attrib boot.ini +s +h

Write you NT bootsector back to drive.
boot /W /DRIVE:C BS bootsect.nt

Restart your computer.
After restarting you can choose to boot NT or Windows 9x.
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Expert Comment

by:hendrik999
ID: 2490781
It is also possible to do it the other way round. If you have NT installed and you want to install Windows 9x.
Keep in mind the previous answers e.g. your fist partitition should be FAT16.
Download http://www.dorsai.org/~dcl/publications/NTLDR_Hacking/boot.zip 
This is a small program boot.exe which can read and write bootsectors to and from a file.
Write your current NT bootsector to a file via:
boot /R /DRIVE:C BS bootsect.nt
Install Windows 9x as usual.
Windows 9x is now the only operating system that you can boot.
Write your current 9x bootsector to a file via:
boot /R /DRIVE:C BS bootsect.9x
Copy this file to the root of the C-drive.
Edit boot.ini and insert the following section:
C:\BOOTSECT.W9x="Windows 9x"

Don't forget to remove the hidden and system attributes first via: attrib boot.ini -s -h
And after modifying put it back via:
attrib boot.ini +s +h

Write you NT bootsector back to drive.
boot /W /DRIVE:C BS bootsect.nt

Restart your computer.
After restarting you can choose to boot NT or Windows 9x.
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