Changing HD on an old Mac II Classic

I have this old Mac II Classic that I use for email and other stuff while I use the PC for everything else.   What I am trying to do is transfer my files from the 60mb drive that came with the system to a larger Apple IBM HD 350mb drive. I bought the cable that supports two internal scsi drives but with both drives connected I still only see the 60mb drive..  On the IBM drive I set the the device ID to 1 with Unit Attention off, Terminator on and Disable TI Negotiation off.  

Since that didn't work I next tried to use the IBM drive as the default drive with the Device ID set to 0 and disconnect the 60mb drive. The screen came up with floppy icon with the (?) mark.  Apparently the drive has not been formated ??  Next I rebooted again but this time I used a boot floppy disk.  The finder came up again without showing the HD..     I am using OS 7.6.1 with 10mb RAM.. I do not have the System Disk's since they seem to be only available on CDROM and I have no plans on buying a Cd player for this old system.
RobuzRetiredAsked:
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Owen RubinConsultantCommented:
Please Clairfy: Is this a MacII (large, rectanular box) or a Classic II (the small Mac with a monitor built in?)
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RobuzRetiredAuthor Commented:
No big deal.. I managed to download Apple's Hard Drive Setup utility and played around with the Device ID's until it found the new drive. I was able to transfer everything and install it.
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RobuzRetiredAuthor Commented:
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Owen RubinConsultantCommented:
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Owen RubinConsultantCommented:
For the record, if you see this before the delete:

You can connect up to 6 drives to an oplder Mac SCSI chain. Do NOT use ID # 7 (all bits on) as that is reserved for the CPU. Also, do not use 0 normally for the second drive. Unless you have set a different start-up drive, 0 is usually the  default start-up. Note that on onlder systems, external devices (ZIP, CDs CD-RW, scanners, etc) and other internal devices like CDs all use an ID. Make sure the new drive does not conflict. I suggest SCSI Probe, a shareware control panel which shows you what devices IDs are connected and what they are.

Also, make sure that only 1 drive is terminated. On older drives, this was done with a set of removable series resotors (small, long yellow or black device with 8 pins), on new drives, a jumper. Use onlt one. Also, try and put this device at the end of cable.

Lastly, new drives need to be formatted. I would have suggested Apple's HD Set-Up or some FWB software.
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RobuzRetiredAuthor Commented:
That is very interesting about the Device ID's. I will have to remember that in the future.  As far as the new drive. The Mac II will only hold one external drive so I made the new drive the default.  350MB is more drive than I will ever need on this old Mac..  It's too bad that I can't add more than 8MB of RAM.  I'm forced in using an old version of Netscape ver-2. Everytime I use it I have to turn off 32-bit access inorder to obtain normal download speeds.  

I changed the ID to 0 since it is the start drive now.  
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Owen RubinConsultantCommented:
If I recall, a Mac II could hold more than 8 MB of RAM actually. You just need to be sure you have a system that can support 32 bit mode (there was a System Enabler for System 7.1 called the 32 bit enabled. Don't know if its still available)

In any case, miht I suest a copy of Ram Doubler. Since its an older machine, an old version miht be fine (I did not ask what version of the System Software you were using, it makes a difference actually). But with a bigger HD, RAM Doubler acts like virtual memory. First it compacts what you have to make more available, and then it can swap on and off the disk. With 8 MB in the system, you can see a vitrual space of 12 to 16 MB. Not quite as fast as real RAM, but it will let you run bigger prorams.

If you want to know more, let me know. But do tell me what OS you are running and I'll see what I have to make it better!
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Owen RubinConsultantCommented:
OH, one more comments: Someone once made little SIMM memory adaptors that put two old small SIMMS together to fit into a single SIMM socket, effectively doubling the RAM if you fill all slots with 2 RAM SIMMs. Might have a look for that too.
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