Kernel Configuration – How to Check…

I have read more then a few times, that something is an option you may need to recompile your kernel.

Is there is a way for me on my COL OpenLinux 2.3 system check to see what the options are for my present Kernel?

For example power management? I believe that by default this is disabled in the kernel for my system but how can I find out. I know I can recompile the kernel but I never have done this yet and don’t want to at this time.

Thank you.
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markpalinuxAsked:
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RobWMartinCommented:
Not sure about COL, per se, but on most distro's you can go to /usr/src/linux and do:

make menuconfig

This gives you access to all of the pertinent kernel options with a nice menu interface.

Rob
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RobWMartinCommented:
BTW:  if you don't have a /usr/src/linux directory, it could be named something else.  To find it, go to /usr/src and issue

find . -maxdepth 2 -type d -name 'kernel'

This should find the root of the kernel source tree.  cd into it and do the make menuconfig.

If you still don't find it, then you didn't install the kernel source onto your system.  You'll need to go back and install it first.

Rob

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RobWMartinCommented:
Another BTW:  You should find the power management stuff under the General Setup menu item.

Rob
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markpalinuxAuthor Commented:
What I am looking for is not a way to reconfigure my kernel but a way to look at the kernel to see how it is presently configured.


Thank you
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RobWMartinCommented:
That should do it, if you are looking at the kernel source tree that came with the distro.

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markpalinuxAuthor Commented:
What I am looking for is not a way to reconfigure my kernel but a way to look at the kernel to see how it is presently configured.


Thank you
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RobWMartinCommented:
The other option is to look in the file /usr/include/linux/config.h (or could be /usr/include/linux/autoconf.h).

Not as comfortable, but it has the info.  Look for APM.

Rob
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RobWMartinCommented:
Don't know if you meant the repeat post of your previous comment.  If you did ...

The make menuconfig command doesn't reconfigure your kernel.  You can't actually reconfigure your kernel without an explicit make zImage, etc. The make menuconfig only gets everything ready for the rebuild. Also, it does give you a nice interface for browsing the current kernel configuration.  Again, this isn't true if the kernel source you're looking at didn't come with the distro (i.e. it will give false info).  

Rob
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markpalinuxAuthor Commented:
I can run this to look at the present kernel options.

That is the wording I was looking for, Thank you.

BTW: Can I look at the present Kernel configuration with make xconfig?
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RobWMartinCommented:
Thanks for the A.

I don't know why you couldn't run make xconfig.  Unless you have permission trouble.  Typically, you don't run X as root, but make needs root privs.  I've not done this in years, so I'm just not sure.

Sorry
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