Epson Photo 1200 Problem

I recently purchased an Epson 1200 Photo Printer.  On the whole, the photos it produces are beautiful.  The problem is this...many of the images I shoot have fairly large areas of black in them (I shoot 35mm and 120mm transparency film which I have transferred onto either Kodak's Photo CD or Pro Photo CD). When I print them with my Epson printer onto Epson glossy photo paper, the black areas often have a strangely mottled and very unrealistic look to them.  I have viewed the transparencies on my monitor with the gamma kicked up very high, and I do not see any any mottled areas - the black areas look fine.  Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks.  Peter Glass.
peterglassAsked:
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weedCommented:
It probably has to do with the fact that when you have large areas of black ink (or any ink) you end up with 1) lots of dot gain and 2) the ink dries very slowly and not necessarily evenly. There are settings within photoshop to reduce the black ink output by a certain degree...I usually cheat and change the color black to %95 grey.
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peterglassAuthor Commented:
To Weed-
Can you tell me specifically what I need to do in Photoshop to change the color black to 95% grey?  Thanks.
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weedCommented:
There are a couple ways as mentioned. The first Non-Cheat way is to go to File-Color Settings-CMYK Setup. Choose the Built-In profile method. Then set your black ink limit to %95. You could also set your black generation to a lighter setting. Play with those settings until you get exactly what you want. Use a 2x2 black canvas as a test so youre not wasting huge ammounts of ink.

The other way is go to your Black channel, open your curves adjust ONLY the black channel. Drag the lower left control point directly to the right a few percentages. Aim for %5 Input. Dont go far enough that your image looks really grey on screen.
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peterglassAuthor Commented:
To Weed,
I am a little confused.  It seems that you are referring to someone working in CMYK.  I am working in RGB (for output to my inkjet printer).  Wouldn't your method mean I would have to convert to CMYK??
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weedCommented:
The CMYK black percentage method does only work when printing with CMYK inks. Go with the "grey reduction" model but since youre using RGB obvioiusly you dont have a Black channel to modify. In that case use your Levels menu to limit the darkest black to a value less than %100.
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FlashmanCommented:
An easier option is to alter the transfer settings when you print.

Select "Print" then select "Transfer". This shows a graph with the end points set to 0% and 100%. Change the 100% to 95%.

Print the picture.

Note that this transfer setting will be retained for all pictures while Photoshop is open.
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weedCommented:
Ah yes id forgotten about that. Flash has the easiest solution that doesnt actually modify your document, preserving the real black.
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