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Win 98 CD-ROM

I'm selling one of my computers with Win 98 OS.  To comply with Windows, I must delete my copy of Win 98 from my hard drive.  The person buying my computer has his own copy of Win 98.  The question I have is:  Can I just copy over the Win 98 OS using his CD-ROM?  If so, what is the easiest way of doing this and will all the programs I have on this computer still be there?  He wants to buy the games I have on this computer.  If this not the answer, how do I go about changing over to his copy of Window 98?
1 Solution
I think its legal to sell a computer to someone and leave the os on the comp if the buyer has a regestered  copy of the same os  in this case I dont see why you couldn't leave the computer the way it is and take the persons money
but if you want to play it safe , assuming you both have the same version of windows ,just take his cd and place it in your computers cdrom and rerun windows with it and all appications should be alright and dont forget to use his ###s
p.s Thats my opinion  I could be wrong  I am no lawyer....
the reason I think its ok is the fact that when you buy a computer from some places that build computers they wont install a os unless you can provide proof that you have a valid resgistration ## or buy the cd for extra charge
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I almost forgot to answer your question about win98
no you cant just copy over his win98 on his cdrom you will have to set it up on your comp
 if you delete yours and then install his , all the programs will have to be reinstalled , and speaking of games does your friend also have resgastered copys of them too???HA  just kidding
Why dont you just swap CDs.
If you have not contacted MS about registering your cd key, you don't need to do any more.
You can do it later if you want.
If there is still time in the warrantee, and you have registered, you can call MS and swith the registration.
If the warrantee has expired, who cares what cd you have, as long as you both have a legal copy for future upgrades.
As far as the rest of the software, that's another issue.
That's my understanding and enterpretation of the software license.
Click Start/Run/regedit
Click Edit/Find/ProductKey
You'll see your CD-Key; Change it to the CD-Key of your buyer.
That's what I'd try first; I haven't done it that way :-(  If that fails you can still reinstall windows which will give you the opportunity to use the "new" CD-Key.

All programs will remain installed so long as you do not change the home directory, which is usually c:\windows, during the reinstall.  I have done that more than 100 times :-)

FYI there is no registration info on a Microsoft CD, only on the jewel case.  Personally, I'd just trade jewel cases with your buyer.  I don't see how Microsoft could be unhappy about that.
If you do decide to swap CDs, you can just uninstall what ever software you want to remove.
To uninstall completely you'll have to search through the registry for leftovers of those applications.
Also, I suppose you could just change the serial number for windows in the registry,  to correspond with the right CD if you don't want to swap them.
You can also reinstall windows from his CD over yours and put the right numbers in, but I think I'm echoeing trekie1 on this last one.
sorry bashley
you weren't there when I was typing.
Bashley, you've blocked another question with an answer that you don't even know whther or not it works, and I quote.."I haven't done it that way".

Please don't continually block questions qith maybe answers, especially when the may not be correct or there may be another solution. By the way, you cannot merely change the CD key. Try reading Microsofts anti-piracy statement on the issue!
fishinopaAuthor Commented:
bashley's was not sure about his answer.  I do not want to do something until I know exactly what will happen.  If I put his Win 98 CD-ROM in my computer to try and overwrite my Win 98 program, I'm not sure what will hapeen.  I want to keep this legal in all facts.  The games he buying from me will be his on only his.  I will not have a copy of tghe games after he takes this computer.
you have two choices, eather rerun his windows over yours and the programs will still work (assuming both win98cd's are same version) or reformat and install his win98 and reinstall all programs
eather way it will be HIS win98 on your computer
The OEM win98 EULA states:
Software Product Transfer. You may permanently transfer all of your rights under this EULA only as part of a permanent sale or transfer of the HARDWARE, provided you retain no copies, you transfer all of the SOFTWARE PRODUCT (including all component parts, the media and printed materials, any upgrades, this EULA and, if applicable, the Certificate(s) of Authenticity), and the recipient agrees to the terms of this EULA. If the SOFTWARE PRODUCT is an upgrade, any transfer must also include all prior versions of the SOFTWARE PRODUCT.
 This would seem to say that to be strctly legal, you would have to give up all media.
You should look in C:\windows\help\license.txt
for a copy of your EULA.
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