Win98 Overclocking

I have PII 333,Ability 650B BX MB, 64MB ram and 6.5GB Segate HDD.
I tried to Overclock my system with 75Mhz bus ie. 75*5=375Mhz.
As win98 boots, things go fine. Next time I reboot, I'm left with a corrupted
harddisk with files losing long names, cross links ie. those accessed during overclocked speed. What may be the reason and how can I solve.

Help me please.
megaastarAsked:
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megaastarAuthor Commented:
I tried to change my PIO mode from 4 to 3 in vain.
I found successful results in Redhat Linux 6.
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sorgieCommented:
42MHZ! Is it worth the effort.
I'm not being sacasatic but I can't believe you can notice it.
Why not just leave it alone, especially if it operate fine clocked at 66Mhz.
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dew_associatesCommented:
Megastar, only certain of the 333's will run at that speed and higher, they must be the earlier "A" version. You may want to try either a 300A or a 466 with the Sloket Adapter. Both run very well at 400+ and 600 respectively.
Dennis
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sandman97289Commented:
Dennis are you sure about the "a" series or are you getting mixed up with Celerons, I may be wrong, just asking....

Megastar, this sounds like a bus speed problem, Try turning off DMA by going to Control Panel->System->Disk Drives, go into the properties of your hard disk and uncheck the DMA option, this will slow down your hard disk but ensure no corruption of data.
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bbousquetCommented:
75 MHz bus speed overclocks your PCI bus from 33 MHz to 37.5 MHz. This can cause problems with hard drives and some add-on cards. Have you tried 100 MHz bus speed (it leaves your PCI bus at 33 MHz which is safer)?
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dew_associatesCommented:
Actually Sandman, I should have clarified my comment. I was referring to the PII 300 in "A", which was the first die without the introduction of blocking instruction for overclocking. As for the 466, I meant the 450 running at step 1.5.

Also, something else occurred to me, megaastar, did you clock this system before or after you installed the OS. If before, you will need to return the system to a default on the clocking, load the OS and then reclock it.
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compmaniaCommented:
Change it back to 333mhz or get a bigger fan, the CPU is getting too hot, I tried overclocking a 233 to 266 (big difference huh) and windows would not boot, I changed it back and no problem. I have also had problems with CPU's under 400mhz and 75mhz bus speed.
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dew_associatesCommented:
compmania, given all of the comments posted here, do you think no one has thought of this (your proposed answer). By the way, you can only overclock the early versions of the Deschutes CPU's that used the "A" die without the clock instruction, so really your answer isn't really the answer.

Megaastar, what motherboard are you using?
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compmaniaCommented:
Dennis, I am just saying it is the only answer. sorgie should get the points.
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dew_associatesCommented:
Deschutes CPUs leave the fabs rated to run at clock speeds of 333 MHz, 350 MHz, 400 MHz, and 450 MHz. The 333-MHz Pentium II is the only CPU in the Deschutes line that still uses a 66-MHz frontside bus (FSB); the rest utilize the newer 100-MHz FSB that Intel introduced--along with its 440BX motherboard chipset--in April 1998.
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dew_associatesCommented:
Here's some clocking info for that chipset.

350 MHz 3.5 100 MHz 440BX
375 MHz 5.0 75 MHz 440BX
392 MHz 3.5 112 MHz 440BX
400 MHz 4.0 100 MHz 440BX

To run reliably at a 100-MHz FSB, you need to have 100-MHz SDRAM installed in your system that will test to 100MHz minimum and preferably to 120MHz.

Increasing the speed of the FSB also increases the speed of the PCI and AGP buses so errors might result from some older components refusing to run properly at the higher bus speeds. For instance, overclocking from 100-MHz FSB to 112 MHz results in the PCI bus being overclocked to 37 MHz (instead of 33 MHz), and the AGP bus being overclocked to 74 MHz (instead of 66 MHz). Because newer PCI and AGP cards are being designed with greater tolerances, however, this is becoming less of a problem.

One instance where the machine boots properly into Windows but then proceeds to develop strange errors could be caused by the quality of the SDRAM in the machine. If you're clocking your FSB to 100 MHz or 112 MHz, (and you can't with the 333) make sure you are using 100-MHz SDRAM that is at least CAS 3 capable and preferably CAS 2. Even in the PC-100 SDRAM subcategory, however, you must choose between a maximum CAS latency timing of "3" or "2." Memory that supports a CAS latency timing of 2 can sustain the 133-MHz FSB overclocking option of the Intel 440BX chipset. CAS 3 SDRAM, however, can't handle any bus speed beyond 112 MHz.
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dew_associatesCommented:
Compmania, you can overclock this chipset if you adhere to the right technique and you have a motherboard that will enable you to adjust voltages. Although I didn't post it, core voltage may be a problem here as well. If you clock up, you need to raise the core voltage slightly.
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compmaniaCommented:
If you don't have a very good fan you can kiss your CPU goodbye. I recommend one this high+ pref. with more than one fan:

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megaastarAuthor Commented:
And at last my PC ran at 375Mhz.
That was a good tip from Sandman.
Thank you.
For those who giggled at my trial, here are the results:

I gained 12% improvement in memory speed,
35% improvement in processor performance,
very good display speeds like 1.5fps @ 54Mhz refresh rate to 10fps @ 75Mhz (OOOopss!!).

And that's it.
If anybody can find out a way to acheive all this with DMA for drives enabled, please mail me.
MY Mail ID: sundharesanv@usa.net

Thank you!
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dew_associatesCommented:
I'll pass on that request. This was originally an overclocking question that, had the bios settings and load-in been done correctly, you wouldn't have had to uncheck DMA.

I'm sure Sandman can respond as to how to achieve this though!
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sandman97289Commented:
Some motherboard bios' have PCI and AGP ratio settings. If your's does then you can set this ratio to be lower, this will allow you to run the FSB at higher speeds and not affect your PCI or AGP bus speeds.
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