CDRW questions....

I just bought a CDRW drive for my computer and now I have some question. If i create a CDRW does that mean i can only read that CD in my CDRW drive? If i just burn the CD and dont ever rewrite it, will it run on other CD-ROM drives? and can i burn CDR in my drive?

thanks
GreatOneAsked:
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jjmcdCommented:
The actual media can be read by some newer drives, but many older drives, and most music CD drives, can't read the CD-RW media.

There are 2 ways of writing a CD.  If you write the CD-RW using the normal CD-R mechanism, you can probably read it on most newer CD drives.  The problem is if you want to add a file you need to reformat the CDR and rewrite the whole thing.

Your drive also probably came with software which allows you to add one file at a time to the CD-RW.  CD's written in this mode can only be read by drives using the same software, so in most cases that means only the drive you wrote it on.
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GreatOneAuthor Commented:
okay
i think i understand but i just want to be clear. if i burn a cdr cd in my cdrw drive will most cd-rom and audio cd drives be able to read it?
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Davy070599Commented:
Yes.

To clarify what jjmcd said:

I suggest using Direct CD from Easy CD Creator if you want to use CDRW. With this tool you can, after formatting the CDRW, use it like an ordinary hdd.  In explorer for instance, you can drag and drop files on it, delete or rename them.  Just like you would do on your hdd.
To be able to use it on other drives, you just have to install the udf reader.  With this driver you can have access to your CDRW like an ordinary CDRom.  Keep in mind that it won't work on the older ones.

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Davy070599Commented:
Info on Easy CD Creator can be found at the following addres:

http://www.adaptec.com/products/overview/ecdc.html
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jjmcdCommented:
Well, the answer there is - sometimes.

It seems to depend on the media ... i.e. some CD players have more trouble with some brands of CDR than others.  Even the color seems to matter - some like silver and others gold!
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pwoolfordCommented:
Have a look at this site http://www.fadden.com/cdrfaq/
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morse_lCommented:
Another piece of advice on a slight tangent to stop you from ruining several CDs!

When you are about to burn a CD (either CD-R, CD-RW or packet) make sure that you turn off all screensavers, APM functions.....basically anything that is gonna kick-in and interupt the PC.

Leo
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Davy070599Commented:
I can agree with morse.  Also it is better to use Windows NT to burn your cd's.  It's much more stable.
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thunderchopperCommented:
Hi, it depends on the medium and the type of recording you use.
- CD-RW
Quite nice since you can write on them many many times, like a HDD as stated previously. However, few CD-ROM drives will read them, and definitely no normal CD players will.

-CD-R
a) single session
This means that all the data that will ever be on the CD is written in one go, and you can't add to it later. These can be read by all CD-ROM drives and also next to all CD players.

b) multisession
With this recording mode, the CD is not finalised so that any space remaining can be recorded on later. Until you eventually finalise the CD, you'll only be able to use it in your CD writer drive.

c) finalised multisession
The majority of CD-ROM drives can read these; however, the majority of audio CD players cannot.

A couple of other points...if you experience difficulties using your CDs on other drives, don't assume all is lost, but try this:
- use different media manufacturers/types. Media vary in the compounds use for the reflective and organic dye layers, and some work better on certain CD writers than others. In fact your drive manufacturer may recommend a certain type.
- use different writing speed. The laser intensity usually stays the same no matter what speed you're writing at. This means that the contrast of the pits and lands on the dye layer increases as you decrease the speed. This makes the CDs more readable to drives with poor error correction.
- if this doesn't help, give your retailer a good smack and torture him until he makes it work. OK, maybe this is not a good option ...

Hope this helps.
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thunderchopperCommented:
Hi, it depends on the medium and the type of recording you use.
- CD-RW
Quite nice since you can write on them many many times, like a HDD as stated previously. However, few CD-ROM drives will read them, and definitely no normal CD players will.

-CD-R
a) single session
This means that all the data that will ever be on the CD is written in one go, and you can't add to it later. These can be read by all CD-ROM drives and also next to all CD players.

b) multisession
With this recording mode, the CD is not finalised so that any space remaining can be recorded on later. Until you eventually finalise the CD, you'll only be able to use it in your CD writer drive.

c) finalised multisession
The majority of CD-ROM drives can read these; however, the majority of audio CD players cannot.

A couple of other points...if you experience difficulties using your CDs on other drives, don't assume all is lost, but try this:
- use different media manufacturers/types. Media vary in the compounds use for the reflective and organic dye layers, and some work better on certain CD writers than others. In fact your drive manufacturer may recommend a certain type.
- use different writing speed. The laser intensity usually stays the same no matter what speed you're writing at. This means that the contrast of the pits and lands on the dye layer increases as you decrease the speed. This makes the CDs more readable to drives with poor error correction.
- if this doesn't help, give your retailer a good smack and torture him until he makes it work. OK, maybe this is not a good option ...

Hope this helps.
0
thunderchopperCommented:
Hi, it depends on the medium and the type of recording you use.
- CD-RW
Quite nice since you can write on them many many times, like a HDD as stated previously. However, few CD-ROM drives will read them, and definitely no normal CD players will.

-CD-R
a) single session
This means that all the data that will ever be on the CD is written in one go, and you can't add to it later. These can be read by all CD-ROM drives and also next to all CD players.

b) multisession
With this recording mode, the CD is not finalised so that any space remaining can be recorded on later. Until you eventually finalise the CD, you'll only be able to use it in your CD writer drive.

c) finalised multisession
The majority of CD-ROM drives can read these; however, the majority of audio CD players cannot.

A couple of other points...if you experience difficulties using your CDs on other drives, don't assume all is lost, but try this:
- use different media manufacturers/types. Media vary in the compounds use for the reflective and organic dye layers, and some work better on certain CD writers than others. In fact your drive manufacturer may recommend a certain type.
- use different writing speed. The laser intensity usually stays the same no matter what speed you're writing at. This means that the contrast of the pits and lands on the dye layer increases as you decrease the speed. This makes the CDs more readable to drives with poor error correction.
- if this doesn't help, give your retailer a good smack and torture him until he makes it work. OK, maybe this is not a good option ...

Hope this helps.
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thunderchopperCommented:
Sorry - didn't mean to post several times.
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