Waiting for shellexecute

How do I persuade Delphi to wait until the program I have just shellexecuted finishes.

I am currently cheating by shellexecuting a batch file which runs the program, then creates a small text file as a tag to say finished.  Surely there's a better way!
johnstonedAsked:
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jwtmConnect With a Mentor Commented:
TheNeil's & Madshi's solutions can be slightly improved by
using MsgWaitforMultipleObjects instead of WaitforSingleObject
This returns when the child process exits, on timeout, or
when a message is placed in the application's message queue.
So you don't need to poll for Windows messages.
You can wait for any number of child processes this way.
- see the Windows API.

Sample:
var
  handle_table : array[0..N] of  THandle;
begin
   repeat
      n := 1;
      handle_table[0] := ProcessInfo.hprocess;
      k := MsgWaitForMultipleObjects(
         n,                   // number of handles in handle array
         handle_table,        // address of object-handle array
         false,               // wait for all or wait for one
         timeout,             // time-out interval in milliseconds
         QS_ALLINPUT);        // type of input events to wait for

      if (k = $ffffffff) then begin
         Tell_the_User( 'WaitMultiple Failed, error %d', [getlasterror]);
         exit;
      end;
      if (k = WAIT_TIMEOUT) then continue;
      k := k - WAIT_OBJECT_0;
      if (k = n) then
         Application.processmessages
      else if (k >= 0) and (k < n) then begin
         with process_index[k]^ do begin
            if getexitcodeprocess(proc_processhandle, exitcode) then
               Tell_the_user('%s Ended with exit code %d',
                  [proc_ids, exitcode])
            else
               Tell_the_User('%s Ended with error %d',
                  [proc_ids, getlasterror]);
            closehandle(ProcessInfo.hprocess);
            ProcessInfo.hprocess := INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE;
         end;
      end else
         Tell_the_User( 'Unexpected result: %d from WaitMultiple',
            [k+WAIT_OBJECT_0]);
   until Application.Terminated;
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Fatman121898Commented:
Hi John,

I commonly use next function to do things like this:

function ExecApplication(APPName, CmdLine: String; ShowMode: DWord; WaitToExit: Boolean): DWord;
//executes as well WIN and DOS application
  var StartInfo: TStartupInfo;
      ProcInfo: TProcessInformation;
  begin
    StartInfo.cb:=SizeOf(StartInfo);
    FillChar(StartInfo, SizeOf(StartInfo), 0);
    StartInfo.dwFlags:=STARTF_USESHOWWINDOW;
    StartInfo.wShowWindow:=ShowMode;
    if AppName<>''
      then CreateProcess(PChar(APPName), PChar(CmdLine), nil, nil, False, 0,
                         nil, nil, StartInfo, ProcInfo)
      else CreateProcess(nil, PChar(CmdLine), nil, nil, False, 0,
                         nil, nil, StartInfo, ProcInfo);
      if WaitToExit then WaitForSingleObject(ProcInfo.hProcess, INFINITE);
    GetExitCodeProcess(ProcInfo.hProcess, Result);

   
    CloseHandle(ProcInfo.hProcess);
    CloseHandle(ProcInfo.hThread);

  end;


Hope helps.

Jo.
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TheNeilCommented:
John,

Of course there's a better way. Try this:

FUNCTION WinExecAndWait32(FileName : STRING; Visibility : INTEGER): DWORD;
var
  zAppName    : ARRAY[0..512] OF CHAR;
  zCurDir     : ARRAY[0..255] OF CHAR;
  WorkDir     : STRING;
  StartupInfo : TStartupInfo;
  ProcessInfo : TProcessInformation;
  State       : INTEGER;
begin
  StrPCopy(zAppName, FileName);
  GetDir(0, WorkDir);
  StrPCopy(zCurDir, WorkDir);

  FillChar(StartupInfo, Sizeof(StartupInfo), #0);
  StartupInfo.cb := Sizeof(StartupInfo);
  StartupInfo.dwFlags := STARTF_USESHOWWINDOW;
  StartupInfo.wShowWindow := Visibility;
  if not CreateProcess(nil,
    zAppName,                      { pointer to command line string }
    nil,                           { pointer to process security attributes }
    nil,                           { pointer to thread security attributes }
    false,                         { handle inheritance flag }
    CREATE_NEW_CONSOLE or          { creation flags }
    NORMAL_PRIORITY_CLASS,
    nil,                           { pointer to new environment block }
    nil,                           { pointer to current directory name }
    StartupInfo,                   { pointer to STARTUPINFO }
    ProcessInfo)                   { pointer to PROCESS_INF }
  then
    Result := -1                  
  else
  begin

    REPEAT                         { Rather than wait infinitely, wait for 0 time... }
      State := WaitforSingleObject(ProcessInfo.hProcess, 0);
      Application.ProcessMessages; { ...BUT put the call in a loop with this }
    UNTIL State <> WAIT_TIMEOUT;   { Loop until the call returns something other than }
                                   { timeout (i.e. something has happened) }

    GetExitCodeProcess(ProcessInfo.hProcess, Result);
  end;
end;

The Neil
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gandalf_the_whiteCommented:
listening...
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MadshiCommented:
Jo/Fatman's code is alright, but doesn't process any messages. That means that your application will look like being crashed.

TheNeil's solution works okay and processes messages, but chases the CPU usage to 100% and DOESN'T CLOSE THE HANDLES!

So I suggest modifying TheNeil's solution a bit. The following code solves the two issues in TheNeil's code:

  ...
  begin

    REPEAT                         { Rather than wait infinitely, wait for 50 time... }
      State := WaitforSingleObject(ProcessInfo.hProcess, 50);
      Application.ProcessMessages; { ...BUT put the call in a loop with this }
    UNTIL State <> WAIT_TIMEOUT;   { Loop until the call returns something other than }
                                   { timeout (i.e. something has happened) }

    GetExitCodeProcess(ProcessInfo.hProcess, Result);
    CloseHandle(ProcessInfo.hProcess);
    CloseHandle(ProcessInfo.hThread );
  end;

Regards, Madshi.
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TheNeilCommented:
Thanks Madshi,

This was some old code that I used way back on Delphi 2 (at least 3 years). I had no idea how it does what it does but it worked for what I needed at the time so I wasn't going to play around with it. I can see what you've done and it makes sense (oh the pleasures of being able to look back at some old code and cringe)

The Neil
0
 
MadshiCommented:
(O:=
0
 
MadshiCommented:
Hi jwtm, good suggestion - and welcome to the family...   :-)

Regards, Madshi.
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