Solved

Disk size in Win95 - Win98SE Network

Posted on 2000-02-16
9
162 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-28
I have installed a direct connection peer to peer network connection between two machines at home, one with Win98SE and one with the original Win95.  Everything works except MyComputer on the Win95 machine reports that the mapped 26G drive on the win98se machine as being 1.99G in size and having 1.99G available.  Can the win95 machine be made to read this size correctly, and if not, what will happen when ther is more than 2G to try to access?
0
Comment
Question by:davidbeach
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
9 Comments
 
LVL 63

Expert Comment

by:SysExpert
Comment Utility
Win 95 does not recognize disks over 2 GB properly. It maxes out at 2 GB both for the size and free space. It will remain at 2 GB free until you actually have less than that free.  It should not cause any problems. You can copy files  and use the networked drive without worrying. I hope this answers your question.
0
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:1cell
Comment Utility
what is the file system on the 26GB drive?

the limitation on 95 is with FAT16 and I haven't seen that on network drives though I guess it's the same.  
0
 

Author Comment

by:davidbeach
Comment Utility
The 26GB drive is using FAT32.
0
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:1cell
Comment Utility
Win95 cannot read FAT32 so it will have problems.  
0
Free Trending Threat Insights Every Day

Enhance your security with threat intelligence from the web. Get trending threat insights on hackers, exploits, and suspicious IP addresses delivered to your inbox with our free Cyber Daily.

 
LVL 63

Accepted Solution

by:
SysExpert earned 50 total points
Comment Utility
1cell - I beg to differ. Since the drive in question is shared, the host computer has to be able to read the large HD and it has w98, so there is no problem. The client ( W95 ) is using the hosts operating sysem and thus presents the info to W95. I have W95 clients that are working with NT file servers with 40 GB of storage. It is just that W95 reports incorrectly the max disk size and free space. It will NOT affect the working environment, and there is nothing to worry about.
0
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:1cell
Comment Utility
I'm sorry but you are wrong.

With NT, it's NOT using FAT32 though.  It's using either FAT16 which does not support 40GB partitions or it's using NTFS which is not accessible under Win95.  Which method were you using? glad your comment was accepted but it's not the answer.

from MS
Windows 95 does not support read and write access to NTFS or HPFS partitions; however, Windows 95 Setup does identify these partitions as hard disk drives.

Microsoft MS-DOS versions 4.0 and later allow FDISK to partition hard disks up to 4 gigabytes (GB) in size. However, the MS-DOS file allocation table (FAT) file system can view only 2 GB per partition. Because of this fact, a hard disk between 2 and 4 GB in size must be broken down into multiple partitions, each of which does not exceed 2 GB.
 
NOTE: Windows 95 OEM Service Release version 2 and later support drives larger than 2 GB using the FAT32 file system. For more information about the FAT32 file system, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

David, which version of Win95 do you have?

If it's 95a, it can only see, read, write to, access 2GB of the drive, nothing more! Don't believe it, copy 2GB+ of data to the drive from the local computer and then go to the 95 machine and try to write something to it.  If its' 95b, you should be able to see the whole thing and there is another problem.  If you're interested in finding the real answer to this, let me know.
 



0
 
LVL 63

Expert Comment

by:SysExpert
Comment Utility
Sorry 1cell, we are talking about a network here NOT a local computer. So none of the information you quoted is valid.
0
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:1cell
Comment Utility
I do understand that ew are talking about a network.  Here are the facts.

On a network, the client machine uses the hosts hardware, not operating system.  The only way for a win95a to see an entire FAT32 partition is if it were using some kind of disk manager through a server.  This is a peer-to-peer network so each system uses its own OS to performa its functions.  If this is not peer-to-peer, the story changes a bit.
0
 

Author Comment

by:davidbeach
Comment Utility
I think that I have to agree with SysExpert because if I had thought this through a bit more I might not have needed to ask the question.  The win95 machine at home and the machine at work from which I type this are both pre OSR2.  Here at work, I have access to several Novell volumes which all show up in My Computer as having a size of 1.99GB.  But if I right click on one folder on one of those volumes and select properties, I find that the folder, plus its subfolders, have a size of 2.82GB, all of which is accessible.  So my conclusion is that while the FAT16 Win95 machines can not directly read more than 1.99GB, and My Computer can not report more than 1.99GB of either capacity or free space, they have no problem with network drives of larger capacity because the network drive is operated by the host hardware and operating system and the results are reported to the client machine.
0

Featured Post

Too many email signature changes to deal with?

Are you constantly being asked to update your organization's email signatures? Do they take up too much of your time? Wouldn't you love to be able to manage all signatures from one central location, easily design them and deploy them quickly to users. Well, you can!

Join & Write a Comment

Windows Mobile Barcode Scanning These days almost every product has a barcode in some way... amongst there are 1D barcodes en 2D barcodes.. From http://www.barcodeman.com/faq/2d.php I found some handy definitions and insights. 1D barcodes …
Sometimes drives fill up and we don't know why.  If you don't understand the best way to use the tools available, you may end up being stumped as to why your drive says it's not full when you have no space left!  Here's how you can find out...
As developers, we are not limited to the functions provided by the VBA language. In addition, we can call the functions that are part of the Windows operating system. These functions are part of the Windows API (Application Programming Interface). U…
Get a first impression of how PRTG looks and learn how it works.   This video is a short introduction to PRTG, as an initial overview or as a quick start for new PRTG users.

763 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

10 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now