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How to make a user like god.

Posted on 2000-02-18
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OK guys. here's what I've got.  Redhat 6.0 installed on a Pentium box w/ 48mb ram.  

This box has 3 accounts - root, john, and rick.  I have the apache public_html mappings set up for the 2 users, so they each have access to upload their own web content.  I want john to be able to upload content to /home/httpd/html as well.  How can I make it so that john has rights to do this?  I've been using linux for about a year, but I've not done much w/ groups. Please give as much detail as possible.  Thanks!
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Question by:kittlej
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chris_calabrese earned 150 total points
ID: 2535202
You hit on exactly the issue when you mentioned groups.

The easiest way likely to be to make John a member of whatever group owns /home/httpd/html and making it group writable.

You can figure out what group owns the directory by doing
  ls -ld /home/httpd/html

You can add John to that group by first finding John's UID in the /etc/passwd file and adding that UID to the list of users in the appropriate group in the /etc/group file.  The passwd entry will look something like this.
  john:<passwd>:123:456:John:/home/john:/usr/bin/bash
The group entry will look something like this:
  thegroup:789:234
And you would then change it to look like this:
  thegroup:789:234,123

The permissions change on the directory is done like this:
  chmod g+rwx /home/httpd/html

You might also want to set the directory so that any files dropped into it are owned by the same group
  chmod g+s /home/httpd/html

Finally, if there's no special group for this (it's owned by something generic like sys, bin, or other), you might want to create one.  This is done similarly to the above in the passwd and group files except that you'd be creating a new entry in the group file rather than updating an existing one.  You'd also have to change the group ownership on the directory with something like:
  chgrp thegroup /home/httpd/html
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by:kittlej
ID: 2554569
Thanks for the help!
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