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4 GB Quota limit

Posted on 2000-02-18
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
Linux seems to have a limit on the size you can set a user quota to (4 GB).  This is not acceptable in the environment I'm working in.  Is there a way to increase the max or get around it?
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Question by:CyberHak
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by:jlevie
ID: 2538278
If you look in quota.h you'll see that the quotas are stored in an u32. By my recconing that works out to just a bit more than 4Gb. So, unless you're into serious system hacking that's the limit.

If you have to have more than 4GB per user about all you can do is to turn off quotas and adopt an administrative solution. You or someone else beats errant users over the head when they exceed what they should be using. That's the solution I use on my file servers except I don't bother with the users. I go straight to their manager.
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by:chris_calabrese
ID: 2538437
Or you can also give each user their own filesystem/disk.

Actually, the main drawback I can see with Linux for this type of large-disk server is that it doesn't let you reconfigure filesystem sizes on the fly.  In Solaris, HP-UX, AIX, UnixWare, IRIX, etc. you can give each user their own filesystem and change the size of the filesystems on the fly without copying data or even rebooting.  Hopefully this feature will come to Linux later this year when it gets journaling filesystem technology (it's hard to do this with non-journaling filesystems because you have to suspend all writes to the disk during the reconfiguration and if you have a journal you can just keep collecting the updates there until the job's done).
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by:bernardh
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jlevie earned 75 total points
ID: 2585259
If you look in quota.h you'll see that the quotas are stored in an u32. By my recconing that works out to just a bit more than 4Gb. So, unless you're into serious system hacking that's the limit.

If you have to have more than 4GB per user about all you can do is to turn off quotas and adopt an administrative solution. You or someone else beats errant users over the head when they exceed what they should be using. That's the solution I use on my file servers except I don't bother with the users. I go straight to their manager.
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by:CyberHak
ID: 2595036
Thanks for the help.  We were looking for a way to increase it past 4 Gigs.  I guess that's just one of the drawbacks of Linux's Ext2 FS.
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