Excel Row Column Pts to Inch

Does any body know How to Convert
Excel Rows Height to Inches
Excel Column Width to Inches
Or Is there any formula to Convert
Row Col H W Points to Inches
Who is Participating?
david_levineConnect With a Mentor Commented:
1 point =  20 twips
1 twip  =  1/1440 pouce (inch)

So... 72 points = 1 inch

You also posted your question twice so you should go to the other question and withdraw it.

deepakahujaAuthor Commented:
Hey David
Can You Explain Little bit More
It's not working that way in Excel
Rows and Columns have a different
set of nos. I don't know why.....
Col Width of 10 is lot more than
Row height of 10
I am cofused Please Explain Little More
about it
XL: How Column Widths Are Determined in Excel  http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q73/5/91.ASP
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Making Squares
One of the (many) frustrating things about Excel is that it uses different units of measurement to specify the height of rows and the width of columns.
Row height is pretty straightforward--it is measured in points. Column width, however, is measured in character widths. If your Standard style is set to Courier 10, then a column width of 12 means that you can fit exactly twelve characters in a given column. For proportional fonts, the character 0 is used to count the characters. (Yup, it's absurd.)
This leads to problems if you want the height and width of a
particular cell to match, thereby making a square. Fortunately, with a little macro wizardry you can bypass this oddity of Excel and achieve the desired results. Consider the MakeSquare macro:
    Sub MakeSquare()
        Dim WPChar As Double
        Dim DInch As Double
        Dim Temp As String
        Temp = InputBox("Height and width in inches?")         DInch = Val(Temp)
        If DInch > 0 And DInch < 2.5 Then
            For Each c In ActiveWindow.RangeSelection.Columns
                WPChar = c.Width / c.ColumnWidth
                c.ColumnWidth = ((DInch * 72) / WPChar)
            Next c
            For Each r In ActiveWindow.RangeSelection.Rows
                r.RowHeight = (DInch * 72)
            Next r
        End If
    End Sub
This macro prompts you for the dimension of the square you want to create, and then calculates exactly how wide and high to set each cell. You can run the macro with a single cell selected, or you can make a larger selection set.
The "math magic" is done in the calculating of the WPChar variable. This is set to a value derived by dividing the width of the column in points (returned by the Width property) by the width of the column in characters (returned by the ColumnWidth property). This value, which is the number of points in a character at the current settings, is then used to calculate how many characters should be used to set the width in the next program line.
deepakahujaAuthor Commented:
Thanks David
for the Square Macro
What I was trying to achieve
was to print Labels in Excel
instead of Word So I can use my Excel
data but unfortunately it seams
immpossible to format the rows and
columns to print Labels
Thanks again for all effort.....
Basically you have 2 options:

a) Mail merge your Excel data into Word and then use its Label feature. Please ask another question if you need assistance on this matter.

b) Not recommended but feasible: With some try and error you can format a worksheet such that the cell(s) will be printed ok. Whether you use one cell per label (*) or one cell per line is a matter of personal preference, I would take the latter unless you data structure does not allow it.

(*) Use the "&" operator (or the CONCATENATE function) to gather the data. Format the cell as word wrapping. As most probably the line breaks are not where you want them, use the following trick: In one cell, say A2, focus the formula bar and press Alt+Enter. This is equivalent to Shift+Enter in Word. Then use &$A$2 (or $A$2) to enforce wrapping.  
deepakahujaAuthor Commented:
Thanks Cri
You are welcome.
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