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Canon BJ5000 Printer error message

Posted on 2000-02-21
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Last Modified: 2013-12-03
Canon BJ5000 & Windows 98 2nd Edition

When sending a large image (say scanned at 720dpi) the printer comes back with 'error writing to LPT1' .... 'Parameter is incorrect'. Everything is fine with smaller images (300dpi). The setup is ECP.

Any help appreciated

Jon Morris (j.morris@napier.ac.uk)
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Question by:MadJock
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by:rayt333
ID: 2544590
It sounds like you are trying to print a photo that simply is too big (MB wise) There are limits on the size of the file that can be spooled and I would say you are exceeding that size. You really won't see much improvement over a photo that was scanned at 300dpi.
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rayt333 earned 200 total points
ID: 2544628
The term dpi means Dots Per Inch, referring to image "pixels per inch" (but printer dpi is different than image dpi).   The meaning of scanned dpi is that if you scan a 6x4 inch photo at 110 dpi, then you will necessarily get an image size of
 (6 inches x 110 dpi) x (4 inches x 110 dpi) = 660 x 440 pixels  which more or less totally fills a 640x480 monitor screen.
Or scanning the 6x4 inch photo at 140 dpi gives  (6 inches x 140 dpi) x (4 inches x 140 dpi) = 840 x 560 pixels  which more or less totally fills a 800x600 monitor screen.
Or scanning the 6x4 inch photo at 180 dpi gives  (6 inches x 180 dpi) x (4 inches x 180 dpi) = 1080 x 720 pixels  which more or less totally fills a 1024x768 monitor screen.
We are not being very fussy about the exact screen dimensions, but you know the size of the area you are scanning (inches), and you know the size of the video image you wish to achieve (overall dots or pixels), so you adjust resolution to get it (dots per inch).   That's how it works, that's all there is to it.   Really!
The idea is like this:   Those three scanning resolutions just mentioned would create three different sized images from that one photo that could be shown on three screen resolutions


The standard rule about printing (assuming printing at original size) is that we must scan for the capability of our specific output device, using scanning resolution dpi = lpi x 1.5. The extra 50% is to accommodate the printer driver's resampling when it creates the halftone screen. Some say a 2.0 factor is better, but more say 1.5 is plenty. 2.0 is the acknowledged maximum limit of usefulness.
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by:rayt333
ID: 2544662
The printing industry's term for resolution is lpi (Lines Per Inch), a measure of printed image resolution-like detail. Magazines are typically 133 or 150 lpi, newspapers are typically 85 lpi.
The standard rule about printing (assuming printing at original size) is that we must scan for the capability of our specific output device, using scanning resolution dpi = lpi x 1.5. The extra 50% is to accommodate the printer driver's resampling when it creates the halftone screen. Some say a 2.0 factor is better, but more say 1.5 is plenty. 2.0 is the acknowledged maximum limit of usefulness. Our home inkjets use a different dithering principle anyway.
One big problem with lpi is that we cannot find lpi mentioned in our printers specifications, because lpi is not within the hardware. Instead lpi varies however the graphic software and printer driver chooses to use the hardware.
There is much uniformity in commercial practice. Those scanned images are typically always sent to 1200 or 2400 dpi imagesetters (to generate halftone screens) for publication, which are very single purpose with known standard lpi requirements, 133 lpi for very many magazines, and scanning at 133 x 1.5 = 200 dpi is correct for most cases.
But at home, we are at the mercy of many different software packages, and we all have a different printer and driver. This makes it pretty difficult to use the (lpi * 1.5) formula, simply because we do not know it. You can however sometimes see this lpi value in your printer driver or graphics software options. For example, PhotoImpact indicates 85 lpi for my HP 6P 600 dpi laser printer. So, 85 x 1.5 = 128 dpi would be a good safe scanning resolution to use. It's more than the printer can normally use (the 50% safety factor), and I don't notice improvement in printed detail if scanning over 100 dpi. And 85 lpi suggests 600/85 = 7, therefore a 7x7 halftone grid, with the possibility of 50 shades of gray. The printer is spec'd at 600 dpi 128 colors, but it cannot do all those numbers at any one setting. Normally, it must use a middle of the road compromise.
The overall significance of this halftone grid is that the printer must use several of its dots to represent each one pixel in the image. This greatly reduces the printers real image resolution capability to a fraction of the printers advertised dpi.
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