Solved

FIle permissions

Posted on 2000-02-21
3
318 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-06
How on earth fo i set the permissions in HP-UX to make all files created in a dire 'inherit' the permissions of the dir? (including uid / gid?)

The dir is chown caduser:cadgrp and chown 775, but when a user create a file in the dir it gets his/her uid/gid. Any hints?
0
Comment
Question by:j2
  • 3
3 Comments
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:rleyton
ID: 2541947
You don't really want to set a directory to create files in another uid (think about it - unless you ARE the user, you don't want that - you always want to know who created the file), and in any form of Unix I've ever used, you can't.

But you CAN set the files to have the directory  GID set. Set the 'set gid' bit. The easiest way is:

chmod g+s .

Or chmod 4774 .

If you want others to write to the file, just make sure that everybody who writes to the directory has a umask of at least '002'.

Be careful with the meaning of 'set gid' and 'set uid' when it pertains to directories - they have VERY different meanings when applied to files.

Regards,

Richard.
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:rleyton
ID: 2541949
You don't really want to set a directory to create files in another uid (think about it - unless you ARE the user, you don't want that - you always want to know who created the file), and in any form of Unix I've ever used, you can't.

But you CAN set the files to have the directory  GID set. Set the 'set gid' bit. The easiest way is:

chmod g+s .

Or chmod 4774 .

If you want others to write to the file, just make sure that everybody who writes to the directory has a umask of at least '002'.

Be careful with the meaning of 'set gid' and 'set uid' when it pertains to directories - they have VERY different meanings when applied to files.

Regards,

Richard.
0
 
LVL 1

Accepted Solution

by:
rleyton earned 20 total points
ID: 2541950
You don't really want to set a directory to create files in another uid (think about it - unless you ARE the user, you don't want that - you always want to know who created the file), and in any form of Unix I've ever used, you can't.

But you CAN set the files to have the directory  GID set. Set the 'set gid' bit. The easiest way is:

chmod g+s .

Or chmod 4774 .

If you want others to write to the file, just make sure that everybody who writes to the directory has a umask of at least '002'.

Be careful with the meaning of 'set gid' and 'set uid' when it pertains to directories - they have VERY different meanings when applied to files.

Regards,

Richard.
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: Port Scanner

Check which ports are open to the outside world. Helps make sure that your firewall rules are working as intended.

One of a set of tools we are providing to everyone as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

In tuning file systems on the Solaris Operating System, changing some parameters of a file system usually destroys the data on it. For instance, changing the cache segment block size in the volume of a T3 requires that you delete the existing volu…
I have been running these systems for a few years now and I am just very happy with them.   I just wanted to share the manual that I have created for upgrades and other things.  Oooh yes! FreeBSD makes me happy (as a server), no maintenance and I al…
Learn how to find files with the shell using the find and locate commands. Use locate to find a needle in a haystack.: With locate, check if the file still exists.: Use find to get the actual location of the file.:
This video shows how to set up a shell script to accept a positional parameter when called, pass that to a SQL script, accept the output from the statement back and then manipulate it in the Shell.

828 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question