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Which is Faster?

Posted on 2000-02-22
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Last Modified: 2010-05-18
Which is faster when accessing a large table.
rst1.open "Select * from Table1 where 1 =2"
rst1.addnew
xx
xx
rst1.update

or

rst1.open "Table1"
rst1.addnew
xx
xx
xx
rst1.update

So does the select table or just table work faster.
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Question by:jtjcomp
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caraf_g earned 50 total points
ID: 2546754
(blind guess) The second is faster, as it does not require the server to interpret and execute an SQL statement.
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Author Comment

by:jtjcomp
ID: 2546771
If i open the table without the select statement will i still have access to all of the fields.
rst1.open "Select * from -- gives me all fields
rst1.open "Table1" -- Does it give me all fields?
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Expert Comment

by:p_biggelaar
ID: 2546804
Normally "Table1" should be slightly faster, however there are other ways to improve performance, for instance:

Dim arrVal(1)
Dim arrFields(1)
    Dim rs As New ADODB.Recordset
    arrVal(0) = 15
    arrVal(1) = 65
    arrFields(0) = 0
    arrFields(1) = 1
    rs.CursorLocation = adUseClient
    rs.CursorType = adOpenKeyset
    rs.LockType = adLockOptimistic
    rs.Open "table1", "Provider=Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0;Data Source=C:\My Documents\db1.mdb;Persist Security Info=False", , , adCmdTable
    rs.AddNew arrFields, arrVal
    rs.Update

is faster than

..addnew
xx
xx
xx
..update

Especially when you are working with large tables while you only want to add records, not opening a recordset is fastest, like:

Dim cn as new adodb.connection
cn.open "See above for example"
cn.Execute "Insert into table1 values (" & xx & ", "& xx & ", "& xx & ")", ,adExecuteNoRecords

though I don't know how comfortable you are with SQL

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Expert Comment

by:p_biggelaar
ID: 2546808
Both your options give you all the fields.

caraf_g: you're quite good at blind guessing ;-)
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Author Comment

by:jtjcomp
ID: 2546828
Thanks guys

I'm giving the points to caraf_g because it was the answer to my first question..

P Biggelaar, your suggestion was great but i think a little overkill for what i'm doing.

Thanks again.....
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Expert Comment

by:p_biggelaar
ID: 2546847
Don't know what you're doing so: could be, maybe you can use it somewhere in the future.

You are right about giving the points to caraf_g: he was first and correct
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Expert Comment

by:caraf_g
ID: 2546853
Huh? Wait.... it *was* just a blind guess. Did someone do a bench test? I don't understand what earned me those points.... though I like it, of course <g>
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Author Comment

by:jtjcomp
ID: 2546862
Your blind guess and then p biggelaar's backing gets you the points..

:)
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