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calling C function from VC++/C++

How I can call a C function from C++/ VC++ ?
Learning  C++/VC++.
Any info pls ?
thanks in advance.
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tridev
Asked:
tridev
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1 Solution
 
jasonclarkeCommented:
depends a bit on what you mean.  Do you mean it is compiled with C, and in a library somewhere,  if so, declare it in an extern "C" block,

i.e.
extern "C" {
   int MyCFunc()
};

void main()
{
   MyCFunc();
}

the standard convention in header files for C stuff that might be used in C++ code is to put something like the following around them:

i.e. in cheader.h

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif

/* All the normal C stuff */

#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif

then the header can be used in both C and C++ code.
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snifongCommented:
You have to declare it like:
extern "C" foo ();
This stops the compiler from complianing about undefined symbols.
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snifongCommented:
snifong changed the proposed answer to a comment
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Shay050799Commented:
can't agree more with jasonclarke
but i want to say that using EXTERN C...

by C++ code only if the function was linked with a C compiler.

u will get link error if u won't do that, cause the C++ linker doesn't recognize this function u have to tell him to link this function as C function.

Shay
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tebskCommented:
C function can be called in C++ by using "extern" linkage specifier.

Syntax is : extern "C" { functions prototype};


Normally for linking C and C++ handles different kind of mechanism. Compilers give a symbolic name for each and every function used in the program and these symbolic names are used by the linkers.

in C, the function int sum(int) may be given the symbolic name as _isum.

But, in C++ it is different because in C++ compilation time polymorphism is allowed.  

Therefore if a C function is called from a C++ program then the linker will search only the C++ symbolic name for that particular function in its symbol table unless it is not specified by "extern" linkage specifier. If not available then it will give the run time error.

If the "extern" specifier is used then the linker is instructed to use C symbolic name rather than C++.
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tebskCommented:
Hi,

C function can be called in C++ by using "extern" linkage specifier.

Syntax is : extern "C" { functions prototype};


Normally for linking C and C++ handles different kind of mechanism. Compilers give a symbolic name for each and every function used in the program and these symbolic names are used by the linkers.

in C, the function int sum(int) may be given the symbolic name as _isum.

But, in C++ it is different because in C++ compilation time polymorphism is allowed.  

Therefore if a C function is called from a C++ program then the linker will search only the C++ symbolic name for that particular function in its symbol table unless it is not specified by "extern" linkage specifier. If not available then it will give the run time error.

If the "extern" specifier is used then the linker is instructed to use C symbolic name rather than C++.

Regards,

Baskar
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lar_jensCommented:
Eh??? Aren't all of you just saying the same thing?? In different ways, perhaps, but it is still the same thing..

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jasonclarkeCommented:
Also, what tebsk has to say is not quite correct, names are mangled in C++ not just to allow compile time polymorphism (by this I think function and operator overloading is meant), but also to enable type safety.

C does not check that the parameters of a method against the call.

so in C if you had:

a definition:
int f(float, char)
{ /* ... */ }

and a use like this:

extern int f();
....
f();
....

the compiler would not spot the error.  This has nothing to do with overloading, just type safety.

To continue his analogy further, the C++ mangled name for:
   void Foo(int)
in visual C++ is
   ?Foo@@YAXH@Z
which is some internal representation for the C signature.  It could easily be something like:
   int_Foo_int
in some other compiler.  This is also why you can't use libraries built with one C++ compiler with code built with a different compiler - the mangled names could be completely different.

In the Windows world at least, C compilers just add an _ before the method name, so void Foo(int) would be _Foo.  So, you can link code generated with one C compiler with code generated by another (with some restrictions).
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tebskCommented:
I agree "extern" linkage specifier  Keeps track of type safety also.


Regards,

Baskar
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tridevAuthor Commented:
thanks.
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