Server X on Ethernet

I work for a business that has thirty Mac PowerPC's networked on Ethernet to Appletalk connections (to the best of my knowledge, no TCP/IP).  We recently installed Apple OS X Server to increase security on our G3 server, but we can't seem to get any of the computers on the network to even recognize the server.

I have run the setup assistant several times.  *Is* there a way to set server X up to use just appletalk?  Up to this point we have been using a simple peer-to-peer networking scheme.

As much specifics as possible would be helpful.
vaarwerkAsked:
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weedConnect With a Mentor Commented:
You assign an IP to a machine through its TCP/IP control panel by selecting Connect Via: Ethernet and Configure: Manually. Enter the appropriate information for your network including the IP address. Make sure youre using IP addresses that are all in the same range...ie. 192.168.0.1, 192.168.0.2 etc. Subnet should be 255.255.255.0....The router is probably your OSX server. The OSX server doesnt have to recognize the clients to serve files. It just has to know that it is allowed to serve files. That part of the setup just requires going into the main OSX serving control panel and setting FTP and WEB services ON. Dont forget that there are extensive help services built into OSX. If youre still confused on the networking aspect its not exactly something we can easily teach in a few lines. You might want to invest in a basic mac networking book from borders. Itll be worth its weight in gold in the long run.
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weedCommented:
The macs on the network SHOULD be able to use TCP/IP (which is faster than appletalk) to access the OSX server. Version 8.6 and up support TCP/IP filesharing. Thats probably your better solution. Something tells me that if the macs arent using TCP/IP they just wont see OSX at all which is what youre getting.
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rbrCommented:
No. X-Server can only use the IP protocol.
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vaarwerkAuthor Commented:
I'm sorry.  That just isn't specific enough, based on the question posed. It is also in direct contradiction to documentation provided with  the program. (skimpy though it is *sigh*)

Assuming that the posted response *is* correct (and Apple *isn't*), how do I assign IPs to these machines, and get the file server to recognize them to serve files?  in an enviroment where the server *was* peer-to-peer (with only one ethernet port), we can't even  get the "Web-Browser" based program to turn files services on to run *on the sever*


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vaarwerkAuthor Commented:
Adjusted points to 250
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vaarwerkAuthor Commented:
Thank you.

I had invested in the book you mentioned (long before this) .. you're right, it *is* worth its weight in gold.

However, the OSX help is not as extensive as you might think.  It is intended for server *experts,* not for those just starting.


You're recent comment, however, is worth the points granted
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