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Transfering a HDD to another machine

Posted on 2000-02-28
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I have non Y2K compliant a machine (A) that has a SCO ver 3.2.4. I wish to take this HDD from A and install it to a Y2K compliant machine (B). Can I just simply disconnect the HDD from A and insert it into B?
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Question by:Malek103197
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by:kawin
ID: 2564321
Your machine A and B are same architecture?

If same (same mainboard, I/O, Video card, etc) you can do that but if not it depend of hardware component that difference.

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by:Malek103197
ID: 2566954
Adjusted points to 100
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by:Malek103197
ID: 2566955
No, machine A & B are very dissimilar. To elaborate more, machine A contains some application s/w that retrieves the system (computer) date and uses it in its code. However, on January 1st, 2000, the system date went back to 1970 and it messed up many calculations in the application s/w. Now, machine A is running Sco Unix ver 3.2.4, and I'm not sure if the Sco Unix, or the computer BIOS caused the date to revert back to 1970. So what I'm proposing is to use machine B, that is Y2K compliant and attach the HDD and try to boot it up. But as you say, all of the drivers for the hardware would be different.

I think I must install machine B with a newer version of Sco Unix and attach the HDD from B as a slave HDD and copy the application over to the HDD with the new version of Sco Unix.

So, my question is how to attach a HDD to a mcahine running ver 3.2.4? I'll increase the points to get all the details of doing this.

Thanks
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by:tfewster
ID: 2578431
Have you tried setting the date forward? It may just have failed to roll over from 1999 to 2000. Or tried installing the Y2K patches? Have a look at http://www.sco.com/support/y2klist.html - there are patches there for 3.2.4

If you have enough space on the new system, you could NFS mount the disk from the old system and copy the app/data across the network. IMO this would be safer than connecting the disk to another system that might not recognise there was data on the disk & just trash it :(

This would get around the immediate problem while you look for info on how to attach the old disk to your new system - tho' this should be easy enough if they use the same SCSI or IDE type

BTW, the SCO website has some useful "How-To"'s, e.g http://www.sco.com/cgi-bin/ssl_reference?104863 - Add a SCSI disk & preserve the data; There is a similar document for IDE drives.

Hope this helps
Tim
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by:Gtrist
ID: 2583421
If you are using SCSI hard drives, you most likely will have problems moving the hard drive to the new system unless you are using similar SCSI controllers. In other words, you are going to have problems getting a drive to move from an Adaptec controller to another brand, and possibly between different models of the same manufacturer. I would strongly recommend that you talk with the SCSI controller manufacturer before you attempt this.
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by:Gtrist
ID: 2583422
If you are using SCSI hard drives, you most likely will have problems moving the hard drive to the new system unless you are using similar SCSI controllers. In other words, you are going to have problems getting a drive to move from an Adaptec controller to another brand, and possibly between different models of the same manufacturer. I would strongly recommend that you talk with the SCSI controller manufacturer before you attempt this.
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by:tfewster
ID: 2583656
Hmm, makes a mockery of the SCSI "standard" doesn't it? I've never had a problem connecting SCSI devices to "alien" systems (e.g. HP tape drive to Sun workstation) so long as they have the same SCSI _type_ (SCSI-1, Single-ended, Fast-wide differential etc), but Gtrist has a good point: If you connect the disk from the old system onto a SCSI on the new system that has other devices on it, it _could_ cause problems on the SCSI so you can't talk to the existing devices.

Malek, you mentioned "slaving" the old disk onto the new system, which indicate you're talking about IDE connections. If so, you need to read http://www.sco.com/cgi-bin/ssl_reference?106525 


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by:tfewster
ID: 2620805
Hi Malek - Any progress?
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by:fbjean
ID: 2677611
I done this many times.
With 2 SCSI disk while using the same scsi controler on the 2 system.
With 2 ide drive.
I install a SCO 3.2.4 on a pentium III 550mhz an it works fine. You don`t have to upgrade your SCO.
Just simply install your old drive in the same place ( same scsi id or master on the first ide controler ).
Don`t try to upgrade from a 486 to a pentium, it will not work.
If you enter in the bios, an set the date to 2000, what append when you boot ???

Also ... do you install the SCO y2k patch uod426c or uod426d. If you don`t, 3.2.4 may have a 1970 problem on all the system you will try to install. There is also a fix2000 program in this patch that you have to try on the all content of your drive to correct all the application you may have.

hope this will help
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by:tfewster
ID: 2749363
Hmmm, Malek seems to have left the site.. Gtrist or fbjean, would you like to post one of your comments as an answer so our collective wisdom doesn't disappear? :)
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tfewster earned 200 total points
ID: 2879684
I'm "answering" this question so that it will become a PAQ and the information won't be lost; If anyone objects, please post a comment and I'll withdraw my answer.

Cheers, Tim
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by:yuzh
ID: 3104752
SCO 3.2.4 is not Y2k compliant, you had better  install a new version of SCO (eg SCO 5.0.5 or UNIX Ware 7) to a new HD and then transfer the data across to the new HD.

You new PC should have intel chips. and
SCO 3.2.4 will not boot on Pentium II or newer PCs. You can use the New HD as
the Master HD and set the old one as Slave, boot the System up, and then transfer the data across.

Good luck !
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by:yuzh
ID: 3104802
SCO 3.2.4 is not Y2k compliant, you had better  install a new version of SCO (eg SCO 5.0.5 or UNIX Ware 7) to a new HD and then transfer the data across to the new HD.

You new PC should have intel chips. and
SCO 3.2.4 will not boot on Pentium II or newer PCs. You can use the New HD as
the Master HD and set the old one as Slave, boot the System up, and then transfer the data across.

Good luck !
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