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User Account Setup

Posted on 2000-03-03
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
I'm trying to setup a user account to receive email on a UNIX server. I have never touched UNIX before and I'm a little lost.  There are existing mail accounts and I do know how to change a password. I'm wondering if I can somehow copy one of the other user directories, and then rename it and change the password.

If you decide to help me there's 50 easy points in it for you but you would need to take it really easy on me, because I'm so new.

I think the version of the software I am using is FreeBSD 2.2.7-RELEASE (sb) #0 1998.
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Question by:UnixNewbie
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by:jlevie
ID: 2582489
Most unixen have an "adduser" command. I can't say for certain that FreeBSD does or doesn't, but "man adduser" would be a good place to start a search.
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tfewster earned 50 total points
ID: 2583021
All users can receive mail by default, so it's just a matter of creating a new user plus a home directory for them.

Take a look at www.freebsd.org - There's a FAQ there on system administration, covering adding a user - as jlevie says, the command is adduser.

http://www.freebsd.org/tutorials/new-users/x55.html walks you thru the process.

The command line syntax of adduser is a bit weird, but just typing "adduser" will prompt you through creating a new user. It uses a "defaults" file, /etc/adduser.conf to help you standardise your user setups.

I would suggest you check the setup of an existing user, with "grep username /etc/passwd". This will return something like:
tfewster:Xy3GzY1K:201:20:login_class:password_change_time:account:expiration_time:Tim Fewster:/home/tfewster:/usr/bin/ksh

"man passwd" explains all these fields. I suggest you use them as a model for your new user if you're not happy with the defaults adduser offers you.

adduser should then create the user entry and their home directory and force you to set a password for the user.

www.ugu.com has links to other FreeBSD resources and guides - Have a look around.

Have fun :)
Tim
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Author Comment

by:UnixNewbie
ID: 2583362
Fantastic.

Thank you Tim.
Your answer was very clear despite the fact that my general UNIX understanding is far frm that. I was looking around at FreeBSD for a while but I couldn't find what I was looking for...

I'm eternally grateful.
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