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Win2K Error

Posted on 2000-03-08
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Last Modified: 2012-05-04
I tried booting up to win2k like normal only to get a Stop error [A Blue screen with white text telling me that windows2000 messed up while booting]

Here is a "summary" of what that blue screen said. For the first few lines, it's nearly exactly what it said, and the rest   is paraphrasing. Beginning summary:

Stop: 0x0000001E (0xC0000005, 0x8041F228, 0x00000000, 0x00000030)
KMODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED
Address 8041F228 base at 80400000, DateStamp 384d9b17 - ntoskrnl.exe
If this screen is the first time you've seen it, then reboot. If not, then Check your disk space, disable the driver mentioned in the Stop message, or change your video adapter drivers.
Also, check your hardware vendor for BIOS updates, or disable BIOS memory option like caching or shadowing.

--End summary.

In my win98 installation, I checked my diskspace [which was abundant] and defragged the partition my win2000 was on.  But after that, I kept on getting the same Stop message & blue screen when I tried booting to win2k.

I tried adding /sos to the line in my boot.ini that described my win2k installation – but it didn’t help me any – no bad drivers were listed or anything.

I also tried the Last Good Configuration option several times with no luck.
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Question by:PuppetLord
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by:pdeleon
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Seems we're having the same problem. Keep an eye on my posting from earlier today... we may ultimately have the same resolve.  I'll let you know if one gets posted to mine.
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osxserver earned 116 total points
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i posted this BSOD solution on anothers question, so i dont know if i should post it back here or just let you read his.  not sure, im new to this.

i can tell you that defragging wont do anything, you should have tried a chkdsk /f or something.  would have been more useful than moving sectors and blocks around : )

you can read your BSOD, but not directly, you have to port it our to text, so you can make something out of the chaos.  you can use a bunch of nifty switches with the windows2k boot, but none of them do very much more than telling you what driver is loading, and if you catch it at the point that a driver is loaded and the system crashes, you can try to assume that its that driver that is causing the problem, but that is quite an ASSumption.

here's what i told the other guy:

Unfortunately the repair (winnt\repair) directory is not backed up when you make changes to the system.

Whenever you try a recovery attempt, setup will ask you for your emergency repair disk (erd) which will contain the information saved to that specific disk at the time you manually create/update the erd.  if you have not created an erd, it is advised that you do so everytime you make a change that you would like on your backup.  this backup mainly holds a snapshot of the registry hives, and just enough information (on one floppy disk (in most cases)) in order to revive your system with its registry and current settings before the disaster.  but remember, you cannot boot from this disk!!  you will be prompted for it in the setup/repair process.

now, the erd is a snapshot of the pertinant information stored to a floppy disk, but not to your hard disk.  so, if you have not created an erd, then all you have is the repair directory on your hard disk.  this was last updated when you installed your system or MANUALLY updated it.  most people do not know how to update the local repair directory, but here is the command (rdisk /s -)  this will save the registry settings to, and only to the repair directory.  now only doing this provides absolutely no fault tolerance for a bad disk, so it would be wise to do a rdisk /s (which will ask for a floppy) and then a rdisk /s - (which will update the local repair directory).

you expressed that you have already installed windows again, which is only a temporary fix, let me propose to you two solutions that will solve your problem the next time you cross this situation.  

One, you can diagnose the dump file, using dumpexam.exe from the windows cd, or the windows 2000 resource kit.  If you cant find that file you can copy it from your NT disks or try using the windbg file, and try to pin point the problem, or two, you can try to remove everything that the HP driver has installed.

First, the dumpexam.exe solution.  when the system dumps, you will find a file with the .dmp extention, usually user.dmp.  if youre stuck in dos, no problem, use the dir *.dmp /s to scan all directories and find all the files that end with the .dmp extention.  here are the command line and the appropriate syntax to use this command:

dumpexam -y <symbol file location> <dumpfile name and location>

so it would look like:

dumpexan -y d:\winnt\symbols d:\winnt\memory.dmp

the output from dumpexam.exe will be found at your system root as memory.txt.

use edit in dos or notepad in your gui to exam this file.  details will be listed.

in order to use the windbg, use the following command and syntax:

windbg -z user.dmp

then the above is applicable.

solution two would be to remove all the files that were placed there by the installer.  of course you would want to use the version of driver specifically for windows2000, if you used a win9.x or NT driver, that may have been your failure.

boot to a prompt and remove the following files:

%systemroot%\system32\drivers\epatapnt.mpd

%systemroot%\system32\hpscan32.dll

%systemroot%\system32\color\hpsj2cx.icm

%systemroot%\system32\color\hpsjtwm7.icm

%systemroot%\system32\drivers\hpscan15.sys

and then finally check out the registry key (if you have installed EZCD Creator Deluxe (which usually ships with HP)):
HKLM\Software\Adaptec\Easy CD Creator\Devices

Each system will be a little different.  if you cant find some of the files that i listed they may be in a slightly different location, use the dir filename.* (or insert wildcards as needed) /s.  this will scan the sub-directories.  use the /p or the pause key if you have multiple file matches to distinguish the location of the files you need to remove.

good luck
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by:PuppetLord
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osx:  I'd like to chat with you asap [that is, when you have time].  there are a few things I've run into that are beyond these posts..  if you'd like to initiate the chat, my chat-program info is below:

ICQ#:  10401416
AIM SN:  Cerberus69
IRC [EFNET]:  PupSrv
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by:osxserver
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i dont use any of those, but aim is running, hope you catch me on.
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