• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 572
  • Last Modified:

CPU overheats

Hello all..

I am using a Pentium II chip @ 400MHz on a ASUS P3B-F mobo, running Win98 SE, and I have ASUS Probe installed, which monitors my PC. I noticed that when I am running more than 7 applications, or when I am running Quake III, the probe tells me that my CPU temp is above the threshold of 75 C. I am not overclocking... my cpu has a fan and heatsink installed, and I have an extra fan installed above my CPU.

My questions are... is it a normal thing for the CPU to overheat during multitask? what is the normal temp range for the CPU? and what are some ways i can keep the temp down, other than installing more fans.

thanks..

 tek
0
kooltek
Asked:
kooltek
1 Solution
 
dbruntonCommented:
Try the following site

http://www.tomshardware.com/

Probably during multi-tasking or heavy intense graphics use (Quake III) the CPU is actually working.  While probably doing anything else the CPU is loafing (idling).  Work implies heat.  Heat requires cooling.  

Apart from more fans you could need a better fan.  Try venting the airflow from your fan to the outside.
0
 
vipatCommented:
I agreed with dbrunton, too. Q3 consume CPU load very much.  You need better cooling system for your CPU. If heatsink and fan replacing is not enough, try applying some thermal compound  to the heatsink surface.

One more thing, I've heard that ASUS read CPU heat from inside-CPU thermisor, which is hotter than the outside one.
0
 
vipatCommented:
Oops, mispelling.
thermisor -> thermistor
0
Improved Protection from Phishing Attacks

WatchGuard DNSWatch reduces malware infections by detecting and blocking malicious DNS requests, improving your ability to protect employees from phishing attacks. Learn more about our newest service included in Total Security Suite today!

 
vipatCommented:
Oops, mispelling.
thermisor -> thermistor
0
 
sinclairjCommented:
try taking your case off and see if the heat dissipates better.  I've had to do this before.
0
 
gfreeman081597Commented:
You may be a victim of CPU marking.

You should download a utility called WCPUID from the following link:
http://cgi2.tky.3web.ne.jp/~nrklv/cgi-bin/softdl.cgi?wcpu27b.exe

This will tell you the CPU id which you can then lookup on Intel's site and see if the chip authentic.

There are a lot of vanilla PC retailers out there that buy P2-350's and then put on there own markings and over-clock the chips to 400.  This increases their revenues through the markup they can place on a 400 rather than a 350.

This may not be the case here, but it worth investigating.

Cheers...
0
 
vipatCommented:
Is it really remarked P-II?

All P-II with deschutes-core (and all later chips from intel) are multiplier-locked. So, re-marking is IMPOSSIBLE unless the chip's PCB are modified too.
0
 
vipatCommented:
Is it really remarked P-II?

All P-II with deschutes-core (and all later chips from intel) are multiplier-locked. So, re-marking is IMPOSSIBLE unless the chip's PCB are modified too.
0
 
spectreRVCommented:
Well,if all else fails (and only if all else fails) u can try out utilities like CPUidle and RAIN which insert wait states(sort of).
Keep in mind this is utility designed for use by overclockers
It will decrease throughput,but atleast prevent longterm damage until u find a more conocrete solution
0
 
spectreRVCommented:
oh my..
mispelling-concrete not conocrete

Another thing,if u have got a Voodoo3 accelerator from 3dfx,it is known to cause some overheating problems
This is because of bad supply voltages from the mobo
I don't know if it is applicable in ur case,try moving the accelerator away rom the processor(u can do it only if it is PCI)
0
 
jilerCommented:
You might also try picking up some heat sink compound from Radio Shack. Sometimes, a slight difference in how the CPU fan sink matches up with the CPU can cause overheating.

The heat sink compound can be taken from the small tube (it's sold in a blister pack usually) and smeared on top of the CPU. The fan is then installed. The compound fills the area between the CPU and the fan and the heat is more efficiently dissipated.

This is a good idea even if your CPU shows no sign of overheating. I use it on all the Socket 7 systems I work on.
0
 
kooltekAuthor Commented:
Thanks for all your help guys... specially gfreeman and jiler :)

0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

Join & Write a Comment

Featured Post

Introducing Cloud Class® training courses

Tech changes fast. You can learn faster. That’s why we’re bringing professional training courses to Experts Exchange. With a subscription, you can access all the Cloud Class® courses to expand your education, prep for certifications, and get top-notch instructions.

Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now