Folder Permissions

in Win2000 how can I change the permissions for individual folders?  When I go into the Personal web manager/advanced/edit properites and change permissions for one of the folders in my wwwroot it changes the permissions for the whole web.
donb1Asked:
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kidglovesConnect With a Mentor Commented:
If drive is NTFS then watch for the 'inherit permissions' button in the permissions dialog. If you have the sub-folders set to inherit permissions from the parent object, then the changes you make to wwwroot will be felt throughout that tree of folders. This will be in the sub-folders' permissions tab.
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sstoukCommented:
I never had a problem with changing individual Folder Permissions.
I discribe my actions so You could follow me.

- Open Windows Explorer;
- Select and highlight the wwwroot folder;
- right click on it and choose "properties"
- choose security tab and make sure that "allow inheritable permissions ...."  in the bottom left are not checked.
- click "Advanced"
- change permissions and make sure that "allow inheritable permissions ...."  and "Reset permissions on All child objects ..." are not checked.
- click OK and you're done.

Never even once the permissions were propagated to Subdirectories unless on the subdirectories the option "allow inheritable permissions ...."  is set.
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donb1Author Commented:
The problem is that when I click on properties, there is no "security tab"
All I have is General, Web Sharing, Quick Finder and Sharing tabs.  Windows 2000 pro hasn't been out that long to have different versions.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Are you using FAT or NTFS as a file system?  In order to have security, you MUST use NTFS.
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donb1Author Commented:
I am using fat 32.  Can I change to ntfs and will it prevent me from reading any of my files?
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
You can convert to NTFS by typing "CONVERT <drive:> /FS:NTFS" - so to convert the C: drive, you type "CONVERT C: /FS:NTFS"

There should be no problem accessing your files, but if something goes seriously wrong, repairing your system can be a little trickier (still possible, just requiring a little more expertise).  BUT - You CANNOT convert back to FAT32.

What I would suggest doing is getting Partition Magic and creating a D: drive which you can make an NTFS drive.
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donb1Author Commented:
I am really afraid to go to ntsb because I have a second drive with many important files in Fat 32, and I also need other files from fat32 in another computer in the network.  My understanding is that once I change my primary drive to ntsb, I can't access these other files.  I am truly amazed that there is no way to set folder permissions in Fat 32.
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kidglovesCommented:
-If you're concerned that other computers won't be able to access a file share, that's not the case. They still can.
-If you dual boot 98 and NT/2k AND you need to access the same physical harddrive/partition in the machine, then those partitions would need to FAT32 because Win9x can't read/write NTFS, not the other way around.
-If you want to be able to still access your FAT32 drive or partition, then you still can. Win2k can read/write FAT32, no problem.
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donb1Author Commented:
Can my other computer on win98 access the files over the network in my ntsb partition?  Also I regularly copy files from my other computer (fat32) to the primary partition on the computer I would change to ntsb.  Can I still do that?
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kidglovesCommented:
Can other computers via the network get to files on an ntfs drive?
Yes
Can you copy from other computer with FAT32?
Yes
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
It's NTFS (NT File System) - not NTSB (National Transportation Safety Board)

See these discussions on the differences between FAT and NTFS:
http://windowsnt.about.com/compute/windowsnt/library/weekly/aa060699.htm?iam=mt&terms=%2Bntfs+%2Bfat

http://www.windows.com/windows2000/en/server/help/default.asp?url=/windows2000/en/server/help/choosing_between_NTFS_FAT_and_FAT32.htm

http://www.skwc.com/nt/ntfs.html

If accessed by a network, all systems will still be able to read files from the Windows 2000 system.
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jskubickCommented:
It's quite possible to read and write NTFS volumes under Win98... Microsoft just doesn't approve of it. See http://www.sysinternals.com/ntfs98.htm

It's a pretty cool product, but don't use it if you actually need to enforce NTFS permissions -- it ignores them totally.

They actually make a version for DOS too. There were even security bulletins circulated about it as a hacker tool (because anyone with physical access to an NT server could pull the plug, turn it back on, boot it from a DOS disk, and use NTFSDOS to access files on the drive at will -- regardless of your NTFS security settings). I suspect that this product is a major reason why Microsoft created EFS (the encrypted version of NTFS).

The biggest problem _I've_ encountered with NTFS is fragmentation. Maybe diskkeeper (up to now the only program available to defrag NTFS volumes) just sucked, or maybe NTFS itself wouldn't allow it, but diskkeeper would NOT consolidate free space. So a volume with lots of little files and thousands fo tiny chunks of free space can easily become catastrophically fragmented if you later need to save a few huge files on it (the only way to fix it being to move the little files onto another partition, defrag, then copy them back on & hope they'll be arranged better afterward). Hopefully the free defrag utility included with win2k, and maybe even a current version of diskkeeper, will do it, but I'm not sure. So far, nothing I've seen can beat the defrag utility included with Win98.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
NTFSDOS and or 98 are not freeware utilities.  If you don't mind spending money then this is something you can consider - but is NOT AT ALL NECESSARY if the only operating system you use on THIS machine is Win2K.
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