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testing for infinity

Posted on 2000-03-14
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Last Modified: 2008-03-17
How do I check to see whether a number has gone out of range?  The check for positive infinity works, but the following doesn't:

float x=1.0;
if (x == numeric_limits<float>::quiet_NaN())
{
  do something
}

What happens is that the comparison always comes up true.

What's the trick to doing this check?
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Question by:Ashurbanipal
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nietod earned 50 total points
ID: 2617422
You don't want to compare with quiet_Nan().  

Use max() instead.  Positive infinity is the only number greater than max(), like

if (x == numeric_limits<float>::max())
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Author Comment

by:Ashurbanipal
ID: 2618308
if (x == numeric_limits<float>::infinity())

seems to work, but

if (x == numeric_limits<float>::max())

generates a compiler error that says max() needs parameters.

Is there any reason not to use infinity()?
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LVL 22

Expert Comment

by:nietod
ID: 2619410
>> Is there any reason not to use infinity()?
Probably not. I simply didn't realize it was there.

>> if (x == numeric_limits<float>::max())
>> generates a compiler error that says max() needs parameters
numeric_limits::max()  does not require any parameters.  (And the code I suggested works, I did test it, because I had never tried that with floating point before.)

I suspect that the problem may be that you have the C (not C++) max() function #defined in your program so the preprocessor is converting the max() if finds to the code of the max function.
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