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productivity issue - unix shell

Posted on 2000-03-15
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Last Modified: 2010-04-21
when typing commands in a unix shell e.g. tcsh, it is possible to go to the beginning by pressing Ctrl and 'a' at the same time.  Similarly, Ctrl and 'e' goes to the end of the line.  My question is: is it possible to go by word?  just like Ctrl and left arrow get me to the previous word.

thx in advance
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Question by:crest
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by:jlevie
ID: 2623433
esc-f & esc-b should move forward & backward by words.
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by:crest
ID: 2628380
that works!!
just wondering if there is any way you can assign esc-b to Ctrl + <-?
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by:jlevie
ID: 2628612
Yep, you can. From the tcsh man page:

"Command-line  input can be edited using key sequences much
like those used in GNU Emacs  or  vi(1).   The  editor  is
active  only when the edit shell variable is set, which it is by default in interactive shells.  The bindkey  builtin
can  display  and  change  key  bindings."

If that isn't enough info, I can create an account that uses tcsh (I always use bash and have since the first version of it) and walk you through setting a binding.
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Author Comment

by:crest
ID: 2633263
that sounds a little bit complicated.
it would be very nice of you if you can show me how to do that step by step
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jlevie earned 100 total points
ID: 2633835
If you execute "bindkey | more" you can see the key bindings. The binding of esc-f (forward-word) and esc-b (backward-word) are represented in the list as "^[f" and "^[b", "^[" being the ASCII representation of ctrl-[ which is the same code as the esc key generates. While you can't bind ctrl->/ctrl-< to anything as that combination doesn't generate a control code as far as tcsh is concerned, you can pick other keys to bind. For instance; "bindkey -b ^F forward-word" changes the binding of ctrl-F from forward-char to forward-word. The old binding of forward-char is lost, but it's also bound to the right arrow key so that's not a big loss. You could do a similar thing with "bindkey -b ^B backward-word"

For these bindings to persist across logins, you'll want to add the commands to your .tcshrc file.

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Author Comment

by:crest
ID: 2644650
it works very well
thanks
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