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Is Developers Edition Required For ActiveX Controls?

Posted on 2000-03-16
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Last Modified: 2012-08-13
Another question in my ongoing struggle to use ActiveX controls.  

The ODELIC.EXE patch on Microsoft's site only works on the Developers Edition of Microsoft Access (And in my case, only works for some of the controls).  My question then is, are the ActiveX controls supposed to work with just the Professional Version of Access?   All the computers in my building except mine have the Professional Version, and none of the ActiveX controls work.  Is there a patch for that version of Access also?

ssteeves
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Question by:ssteeves
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by:JimMorgan
ID: 2625284
ssteeves:  ODELIC.EXE is only used to properly set the license in the registry for the runtime version of Access.  It doesn't have anything to do with other ActiveX controls.

However, if you are distributing apps with ActiveX controls, unless you use the Developers Edition or another installation program like Wise, etc., the ActiveX controls may not be distributed and may not be registered on each computer.

I'm not quite sure what you mean by the 'Professional' version of Access.  There is only one version of Access.  The ODE is just another software product which allows you to distribute runtime versions of Access.

Is this just a problem with your computer?  It appears that you are developing an App and then when you try to run it on another computer, it doesn't recognize the ActiveX controls.  Is this the case?

Jim
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by:pclement
ID: 2626580
JimMorgan,

Actually, the file is exactly for what he stated as documented in the following MS KB article:

http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q172/8/59.ASP

ssteves,

Perhaps you could indicate which ActiveX controls you are having difficulty with, and secondly have you installed the Office Developer Tools CD?

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by:JimMorgan
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pclement:  I was under the impression that the ODE wasn't involved here.  If the ODE is used to install the app, then there is no need to run odeocxfix.  It didn't seem like this is one of the situations with a messed up system where more than one runtime type program is loaded.  I could be wrong.  I guess we will have to wait for ssteves to get back to us.
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by:ssteeves
ID: 2627653
Adjusted points from 30 to 40
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by:ssteeves
ID: 2627654
Sorry, I'll clarify my question a bit.  I have Access Developers Toolkit installed on my PC. (The main difference that I see with this toolkit is the ablility to create Setup Programs for my Databases). Whenever I tried to add an ActiveX control such as Microsoft Common Dialog Control, or Progress Bar control, I used to get the,  "You Don't Have a License. Error Using ActiveX Control", error Message.  dJettman told me about the ODELIC.EXE patch, and I ran it.  It fixed some of my ActiveX controls.  Not all them, but enough to suit my needs for now.  

All the other computers in my building (About 150 of them) have the regular version of Access on them.  (I thought it was called the Professional version, but I guess it's just Access 97 SR2).  When a user on those computers try to add an ActiveX control to a database, such as the Common Dialog Control, they also get the No License Error Message.  I tried to run the ODELIC.EXE patch on their computers, and it would not run, as the Developers Toolkit was not installed on those machines.  We don't want to have to purchase the Devlopers Toolkit for all those computers, but it would still be nice if they could add some ActiveX controls to their databases.    Because they don't have the Developers Toolkit installed, does that mean they are not supposed to be able to add any ActiveX controls to their databases?

Does this make things any clearer?

ssteeves
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by:ssteeves
ID: 2627665
Also, for this particular question, I'm not at all concerned with developing a database on my computer and distributing it to another computer.  I want to assume that I create a database on my computer only for my use, and someone on another comptuer creates a database strictly for use on thier computer.   I just want to know why out of all the computers in my building, none can add an ActiveX control such as Microsoft Common Dialog to their forms, unless they have the ODE toolkit installed with the ODELIC.EXE patch installed.....
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE) earned 40 total points
ID: 2627780
ssteeves,

  That's correct.  To use the Active-X controls at design time, they need the ODE.  That's where the license to use the control comes from.

Jim.
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ID: 2627782
Oh and the "Professional" name you were thinking of applies to Office.

  Standard Office excludes Access, the "Professional" version includes it.  The next step up is the Developers version, which has all the ODE stuff.

Jim.
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by:ssteeves
ID: 2627922
Thanks again JDettman.  I'm going to leave this question open for until after the weekend to see if I get anymore comments, but I'll award points then.
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by:pclement
ID: 2628137
Just to confirm what JDettman is saying, in order to have development licenses (which enables you to add these ActiveX controls to your project without receiving the license message), the ODE Tools must be installed. Once you've distributed your database users will not be required to have the ODE Tools installed for runtime. But if your users want to then add one of these components to a database project, they will need the ODE Tools installed as well.

The only exception here is if you were to have the 32-bit version of VB 4.0, or 5.0/6.0 installed, as they provide design-time licenses for these files as well.

ODELIC.EXE simply fixes a bug in the ODE Tools install where the install fails to merge the licenses into the registry because you already have the latest versions (probably installed by another application) of the controls on your machine.

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by:ssteeves
ID: 2635699
Thanks.
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