Solved

Minimum harddisk size for a Linux server

Posted on 2000-03-16
12
288 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-20
My small office have some Win95/98 workstations but no any server.

I want to have a Linux server with these services:
1. File and printer sharing service for the Win95/98 workstations
2. An internal mail service

Can I use a 200-300MB harddisk to install this server?

Can it be done easily in Redhat 6.1 GUI setup?

THANK YOU VERY MUCH.
0
Comment
Question by:saikit
  • 7
  • 5
12 Comments
 
LVL 40

Accepted Solution

by:
jlevie earned 50 total points
ID: 2626513
Not if it was going to provide those services. I could easily envision wanting to use that much space just for the mail spool, even for a small workgroup. And then there'll be the need for space to hold the shared files.

I'd say that you'd need a 2Gb drive at least, and you'd want to only install things that are essential to the services to be provided to make the most space available for file/printer sharingand email. A 4Gb drive would be a lot more comfortable.
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
ID: 2626516
Whoops, hit submit before answering the last part of your question. Yes, if the environment isn't too terribly complex, you can set everything up with a GUI.
0
 

Author Comment

by:saikit
ID: 2626575
If not include the storge for mail, files and print spool, what is the actual minimum size for such server's component? (Can I not install the XWindows?)
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
ID: 2626686
If you install a non-X windows server with virtually no applications? I don't know for sure as I've never done one like that (but I'm pretty sure I could squeeze it onto a 200-300Mb disk). At the extreme bottom end you've got something that will fit on a floppy and you go up from there as you add services and apps. I realize that's a pretty vague answer, but without knowing the minimum requirements and actually putting an install in place that actaully meets those requirements it's difficult to be specific.
0
 

Author Comment

by:saikit
ID: 2626807
If you can tell me that the harddisk size required by the Kernel, SAMBA, NFS server, DNS name server and Mail tools; and also comfirm me if it is possible to run them without XWindows, then I think that I have the answer of this question.

Thank you very much.

Best regards,

Sunny
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
ID: 2627707
Can do. I'll do a minimal install for just those services and tell you how big it wound up.

Yes you can manage the box without X. Linux conf, the principal tool, also will run on a standard console screen or over a telnet session to the server in a VT100 terminal emulator.
0
What Should I Do With This Threat Intelligence?

Are you wondering if you actually need threat intelligence? The answer is yes. We explain the basics for creating useful threat intelligence.

 

Author Comment

by:saikit
ID: 2630206
So, what's the size?
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
ID: 2630320
Shortly, give a chance to test it and make sure I've got everything installed that you have to have to run and maintain the box.
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
ID: 2630628
I make the as installed size to be 223MB. The size will grow by 5-15 MB as you configure and set up the system.

Okay, it'll fit on a 300MB disk with a little space available for log files and print jobs. Be aware that print jobs from clients have to have spool space, and mail queues will also need space. A 1GB disk would make a more realistic and more usseable server.

I was able to bring up NFS, Samba, mail, and a cacheing DNS server. I didn't bother to configure a real DNS server, as if a cacheing server works a real server will also.
0
 

Author Comment

by:saikit
ID: 2630697
Excellent! Excellent!
You should answered my question, just want to have more info:

Did you using RedHat6.1 and is it difficult to do that?
Please give hints, so I can follow the installation as you.

Thank you.



0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
ID: 2631320
The way I did it is very easy, as I thought you'd want an easy method. And yes, I used RedHat 6.1 as that is what you indicated you were going to use.

I would recommend that you look at the Hardware Compatibility List and make sure that your hardware is on the supported list of devices before you install it. The list is available on-line at http://www.redhat.com/support/hardware/intel/61/rh6.1-hcl-i.ld.html. Just about any motherboard will be okay, but Linux is a bit picky about ethernet and video cards. Disk drives and CD's aren't usually a problem as long as they aren't ATA-66 drives (ATA-66 will be supported later).

Before starting the install go into the bios setup and turn PnP mode off. Linux doesn't use PnP and it will usually cause problems (it won't hurt windows 95/98 if PnP is off). The ethernet card may need to be specially configured for Linux. If you'll tell me what ethernet card you've got I can probably tell you if needs special treatment.

The install is very straight forward. Do a normal (not "expert") and select "Custom" when it gets to the software section. There will be a list of categories and you simply check on/off the ones desired. I think it'll be very obvious what to do when you get there.
0
 

Author Comment

by:saikit
ID: 2749844
Thank you very much!
Rich of info that for me to follow.
0

Featured Post

Maximize Your Threat Intelligence Reporting

Reporting is one of the most important and least talked about aspects of a world-class threat intelligence program. Here’s how to do it right.

Join & Write a Comment

Suggested Solutions

Title # Comments Views Activity
mapBully challenge 6 89
Sed question 2 48
unix example issues 18 49
Trying to run powershell  in a batch file. How do I do this? 8 44
If you use Debian 6 Squeeze and you are tired of looking at the childish graphical GDM login screen that is used by default, here's an easy way to change it. If you've already tried to change it you've probably discovered that none of the old met…
Exception Handling is in the core of any application that is able to dignify its name. In this article, I'll guide you through the process of writing a DRY (Don't Repeat Yourself) Exception Handling mechanism, using Aspect Oriented Programming.
Get a first impression of how PRTG looks and learn how it works.   This video is a short introduction to PRTG, as an initial overview or as a quick start for new PRTG users.
This demo shows you how to set up the containerized NetScaler CPX with NetScaler Management and Analytics System in a non-routable Mesos/Marathon environment for use with Micro-Services applications.

760 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

21 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now