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Creating derived classes in a DLL

I have a DLL which creates several derived classes and passes them back to an application. I then want the application to handle these classes itself.
Is there any way I can get these classes to use the application's memory space so they can be deleted from inside the application ?
I have heard that by compiling the DLL with MFC, you can share memory but I want to avoid using MFC.

Kevin Turner
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kevinturner
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kevinturner
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1 Solution
 
nietodCommented:
You can share dynamically allocated memory without using MFC.

I'll post an answer from another question on this.
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nietodCommented:
The problem is that if the EXE and DLL use the staticly linked version of the run-time library (RTL), they each have their own seperate copies of the RTL.  These copies each have thier own seperate heaps for allocating memory with the new operator.   The problem is that each one does not "know" about the other.  So for example, if the DLL allocates memory, the memory comes from the heap in the DLL's copy of the RTL.  If a pointer to that memory is passed back to the EXE (it may be passed in a subtle way, like inside a class) and if that EXE later makes changes that require that the memory specified by the pointer be deleted, then the EXE will try to delete the memory, but will not be able to find the memory inside its heap.  This is is because the memory did not come from the heap.  Hence the problem.

The solution is to have the EXE and all the C++ DLLS that it uses link with the DLL version of the RTL.  Then the EXE and all the DLLS will share a single copy of the run-time library and will therefore share a single heap.

To set this in VC:

"Project" menu
"Settings..." menu item
in the dialog box that appears  "C/C++" tab
"Code generation" Category
in "Use run-time library:" select one of the DLL options.

(There are two DLLoptions there, one for a debug version, one for a release version.  Make sure you choose the setting that is right for the version you are creating)

Note that these settings need to be changed for EVERY version (debug. release etc) of the EXE and and DLLs that is shares memory with.
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