Solved

can't see linux server when browsing network with NT workstation/W98

Posted on 2000-03-19
30
492 Views
Last Modified: 2012-06-21
I was able to use samba (1.9?) under the Macmillan Red Hat 5.2. I changed to the "Official Red Hat 6.1" and when I browse the network with my NT workstation (4.0 sp6), I see and use the other W98/NT computers in the network, however, I am unable to see the Linux server (named cow). I can ping successfully to and from cow. I can also access it via the IP address (192.168.1.1), I can FTP under anonymous and user (eric), I can also access it using http and have use of linuxconf. It does NOT, however, respond to "cow.sis.com" (my domain being "sis.com")

Help is appreciated
0
Comment
Question by:emherman
  • 17
  • 11
  • +1
30 Comments
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
ID: 2633529
I'll bet your /etc/hosts file has a line in it pretty much like

192.168.1.1  localhost.localdomain cow.sys.com

Make the hosts file look like:

127.0.0.1    localhost.localdomain localhost
192.168.1.1  cow.sis.com cow

It wouldn't hurt to look at /etc/resolv.conf (assuming you are using DNS) and make sure that it has the correct domain name and nameservers, something like:

domain sis.com
nameserver first-ns-ip
nameserver second-ns-ip

And you can check the default gateway (assuming there is a default out of the local net) with "netstat -rn". The line that has a destination of 0.0.0.0 should show the gateway IP of your default gateway.
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
ID: 2633540
Oh yeah, when all of the above is correct you can set up Samba (linuxconf is the easiest) and on a reboot Samba should start up okay. Typically you'll want to use Samba encrypted passwords, and each windows user will need an entry in the samba password file, but you may already know all of that.
0
 

Expert Comment

by:AGB
ID: 2636944
You can configure and start samba server only in order to view cow server in Network Neighborhood.

Try /usr/sbin/samba start
0
 

Expert Comment

by:mjn020200
ID: 2684556
the network neighbor is avail in IP environment if wins is enabled. re-check if wins support=yes is /etc/smb.conf  if ok, then from NT, try "net use z: \\cow.xxxx.xxx.xx\your_share name /u:your userid and enter.. enter password.. this should help you to see if smb itself is functioning properly.
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:emherman
ID: 2775721
[root@cow eric]# netstat -rn
Kernel IP routing table
Destination     Gateway         Genmask         Flags   MSS Window  irtt Iface
192.168.1.1     0.0.0.0         255.255.255.255 UH        0 0          0 eth0
192.168.1.0     0.0.0.0         255.255.255.0   U         0 0          0 eth0
127.0.0.0       0.0.0.0         255.0.0.0       U         0 0          0 lo
0.0.0.0         192.168.1.254   0.0.0.0         UG        0 0          0 eth0  

This is the values of netstat -rn. Not to show my newbieism, but where is the file to change the gateway values?
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:emherman
ID: 2775730
127.0.0.1       localhost.localdomain   localhost
192.168.1.1     cow.sis.com     cow
192.168.1.10    officent.sis.com        officent # Office on NT

Oh yeah, here is /etc/hosts. Can I pull officent if it is just going to be a client?

domain sis.com
search localdomain
nameserver 192.168.1.1  

Here is /etc/resolv.conf

0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
ID: 2776109
Okay, your routing tables look fine (that was sort of a given as TCP/IP protocols are working correctly on the local lan). Also, there's not problem with the way the hosts file is set up.

So, the problem has to be in the way Samba is set up and working. It's probably a silly question, but the Linux system and the windows boxes are in the same Workgroup, right? The next question is whether Samba is running and has a legal (in Samba terms) smb.conf file. You should have "testparm" somewhere and it can do a sanity check of your Samba configuration. You can check to see if Samba is running by doing "ps -ef | grep mbd | grep -v grep" which should return at least two lines of output, one for nmbd and one for smbd.

Now as to your last comment, yes you don't have to have any clients listed in /etc/hosts, especially if you are running a local DNS server (as /etc/resolv.conf indicates).
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:emherman
ID: 2777019
My apologies for those of you who think I posted too much but I wanted to show how RH Linux 6.1 sets up samba without editing /etc/smb.conf directly...

So here goes:#======================= Global Settings =====================================
[global]
 
# workgroup = NT-Domain-Name or Workgroup-Name
    workgroup = sis.com
 
# server string is the equivalent of the NT Description field
    server string = Samba Server
 
# This is the main Samba configuration file. You should read the
# smb.conf(5) manual page in order to understand the options listed
# here. Samba has a huge number of configurable options (perhaps too
# many!) most of which are not shown in this example
#
# Any line which starts with a ; (semi-colon) or a # (hash)
# is a comment and is ignored. In this example we will use a #
# for commentry and a ; for parts of the config file that you
# may wish to enable
#
# NOTE: Whenever you modify this file you should run the command "testparm"
# to check that you have not many any basic syntactic errors.
#
#======================= Global Settings =====================================
[global]
 
# workgroup = NT-Domain-Name or Workgroup-Name
    workgroup = sis.com
 
# server string is the equivalent of the NT Description field
    server string = Samba Server
 
# This option is important for security. It allows you to restrict
# connections to machines which are on your local network. The
# following example restricts access to two C class networks and
# the "loopback" interface. For more examples of the syntax see
# the smb.conf man page
;   hosts allow = 192.168.1. 192.168.2. 127.
 
# if you want to automatically load your printer list rather
# than setting them up individually then you'll need this
    printcap name = /etc/printcap
    load printers = yes
 
# It should not be necessary to spell out the print system type unless
# yours is non-standard. Currently supported print systems include:
# bsd, sysv, plp, lprng, aix, hpux, qnx
;   printing = bsd
 
# Uncomment this if you want a guest account, you must add this to /etc/passwd
# otherwise the user "nobody" is used
;  guest account = pcguest
 
# this tells Samba to use a separate log file for each machine
# that connects
    log file = /var/log/samba/log.%m
 
# Put a capping on the size of the log files (in Kb).
    max log size = 50
 
# Security mode. Most people will want user level security. See
# security_level.txt for details.
    security = user
# Use password server option only with security = server
;   password server = <NT-Server-Name>
 
# Password Level allows matching of _n_ characters of the password for
# all combinations of upper and lower case.
;  password level = 8
;  username level = 8
 
# You may wish to use password encryption. Please read
# ENCRYPTION.txt, Win95.txt and WinNT.txt in the Samba documentation.
# Do not enable this option unless you have read those documents
;  encrypt passwords = yes
;  smb passwd file = /etc/smbpasswd
 
# The following are needed to allow password changing from Windows to
# update the Linux sytsem password also.
# NOTE: Use these with 'encrypt passwords' and 'smb passwd file' above.
# NOTE2: You do NOT need these to allow workstations to change only
#        the encrypted SMB passwords. They allow the Unix password
#        to be kept in sync with the SMB password.
;  unix password sync = Yes
;  passwd program = /usr/bin/passwd %u
 
;  passwd chat = *New*UNIX*password* %n\n *ReType*new*UNIX*password* %n\n *passw
d:*all*authentication*tokens*updated*successfully*
 
# Unix users can map to different SMB User names
;  username map = /etc/smbusers
 
# Using the following line enables you to customise your configuration
# on a per machine basis. The %m gets replaced with the netbios name
# of the machine that is connecting
;   include = /etc/smb.conf.%m
 
# Most people will find that this option gives better performance.
# See speed.txt and the manual pages for details
    socket options = TCP_NODELAY SO_RCVBUF=8192 SO_SNDBUF=8192
 
# Configure Samba to use multiple interfaces
# If you have multiple network interfaces then you must list them
# here. See the man page for details.
;   interfaces = 192.168.12.2/24 192.168.13.2/24
 
# Configure remote browse list synchronisation here
#  request announcement to, or browse list sync from:
#       a specific host or from / to a whole subnet (see below)
 
;   remote browse sync = 192.168.3.25 192.168.5.255
;   remote browse sync = 192.168.3.25 192.168.5.255
# Cause this host to announce itself to local subnets here
;   remote announce = 192.168.1.255 192.168.2.44
 
# Browser Control Options:
# set local master to no if you don't want Samba to become a master
# browser on your network. Otherwise the normal election rules apply
;   local master = no
 
# OS Level determines the precedence of this server in master browser
# elections. The default value should be reasonable
;   os level = 33
 
# Domain Master specifies Samba to be the Domain Master Browser. This
# allows Samba to collate browse lists between subnets. Don't use this
# if you already have a Windows NT domain controller doing this job
;   domain master = yes
 
# Preferred Master causes Samba to force a local browser election on startup
# and gives it a slightly higher chance of winning the election
;   preferred master = yes
 
# Use only if you have an NT server on your network that has been
# configured at install time to be a primary domain controller.
;   domain controller = <NT-Domain-Controller-SMBName>
 
# Enable this if you want Samba to be a domain logon server for
# Windows95 workstations.
;   domain logons = yes
 
# if you enable domain logons then you may want a per-machine or
# per user logon script
# run a specific logon batch file per workstation (machine)
;   logon script = %m.bat
# run a specific logon batch file per username
;   logon script = %U.bat
 
# Where to store roving profiles (only for Win95 and WinNT)
#        %L substitutes for this servers netbios name, %U is username
#        You must uncomment the [Profiles] share below
;   logon path = \\%L\Profiles\%U
 
# All NetBIOS names must be resolved to IP Addresses
# 'Name Resolve Order' allows the named resolution mechanism to be specified
# the default order is "host lmhosts wins bcast". "host" means use the unix
# system gethostbyname() function call that will use either /etc/hosts OR
# DNS or NIS depending on the settings of /etc/host.config, /etc/nsswitch.conf
# and the /etc/resolv.conf file. "host" therefore is system configuration
# dependant. This parameter is most often of use to prevent DNS lookups
# in order to resolve NetBIOS names to IP Addresses. Use with care!
# The example below excludes use of name resolution for machines that are NOT
# on the local network segment
# - OR - are not deliberately to be known via lmhosts or via WINS.
; name resolve order = wins lmhosts bcast
 
# Windows Internet Name Serving Support Section:
# WINS Support - Tells the NMBD component of Samba to enable it's WINS Server
;   wins support = yes
 
# WINS Server - Tells the NMBD components of Samba to be a WINS Client
#       Note: Samba can be either a WINS Server, or a WINS Client, but NOT both
;   wins server = w.x.y.z
 
# WINS Proxy - Tells Samba to answer name resolution queries on
# behalf of a non WINS capable client, for this to work there must be
# at least one  WINS Server on the network. The default is NO.
;   wins proxy = yes
 
# DNS Proxy - tells Samba whether or not to try to resolve NetBIOS names
# via DNS nslookups. The built-in default for versions 1.9.17 is yes,
# this has been changed in version 1.9.18 to no.
    dns proxy = no
    unix password sync = no
    comment = Samba Server
    encrypt passwords = no
    map to guest = never
    password level = 0
    null passwords = no
    allow hosts = 192.168.1.
    os level = 0
    preferred master = no
    domain master = no
    wins support = no
    dead time = 0
    debug level = 0
 
# Case Preservation can be handy - system default is _no_
# NOTE: These can be set on a per share basis
;  preserve case = no
;  short preserve case = no
# Default case is normally upper case for all DOS files
;  default case = lower
# Be very careful with case sensitivity - it can break things!
;  case sensitive = no
 
#============================ Share Definitions ==============================
[homes]
    comment = Home Directories
    browseable = yes
    writable = yes
    public = no
    allow hosts = 192.168.1.
    only user = no
 
# Un-comment the following and create the netlogon directory for Domain Logons
; [netlogon]
;   comment = Network Logon Service
;   path = /home/netlogon
;   guest ok = yes
;   writable = no
;   share modes = no
 
 
# Un-comment the following to provide a specific roving profile share
# the default is to use the user's home directory
;[Profiles]
;    path = /home/profiles
;    browseable = no
;    guest ok = yes
 
 
# NOTE: If you have a BSD-style print system there is no need to
# specifically define each individual printer
[printers]
    comment = All Printers
    path = /var/spool/samba
    browseable = no
# Set public = yes to allow user 'guest account' to print
    guest ok = no
    writable = no
    printable = yes

0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:emherman
ID: 2777069
here are the results of testparm. Newbie Alert!! What character do I use to get the vertical lines in "ps -ef | grep mbd | grep -v grep". If I'm supposed to type those in as three separate commands then "ps -ef" gave me a ~20 line readout and "grep mbd" just sat there.. I'm doing all this from my NT workstation (officent) telnet'ed into linux box as SU ROOT.

[root@cow eric]# testparm
Load smb config files from /etc/smb.conf
Loaded services file OK.
Press enter to see a dump of your service definitions
 
# Global parameters
[global]
        workgroup = SIS.COM
        netbios name =
        netbios aliases =
        server string = Samba Server
        interfaces =
        bind interfaces only = No
        security = USER
        encrypt passwords = No
        update encrypted = No
        allow trusted domains = Yes
        hosts equiv =
        min passwd length = 5
        map to guest = Never
        null passwords = No
        password server =
        smb passwd file = /etc/smbpasswd
        root directory = /
        passwd program = /bin/passwd
        passwd chat = *old*password* %o\n *new*password* %n\n *new*password* %n\
n *changed*
        passwd chat debug = No
        username map =
        password level = 0
        username level = 0
        unix password sync = No
        restrict anonymous = No
        use rhosts = No
        log level = 0
        syslog = 1
        syslog only = No
        log file = /var/log/samba/log.%m
        max log size = 50
        timestamp logs = Yes
        protocol = NT1
        read bmpx = No
        read raw = Yes
        write raw = Yes
        nt smb support = Yes
        nt pipe support = Yes
        nt acl support = Yes
        announce version = 4.2
        announce as = NT
        max mux = 50
        max xmit = 65535
        name resolve order = lmhosts host wins bcast
        max packet = 65535
        max ttl = 259200
        max wins ttl = 518400
        min wins ttl = 21600
        time server = No
        change notify timeout = 60
        deadtime = 0
        getwd cache = Yes
        keepalive = 300
        lpq cache time = 10
        max disk size = 0
        max open files = 10000
        read prediction = No
        read size = 16384
        shared mem size = 1048576
        socket options = TCP_NODELAY SO_RCVBUF=8192 SO_SNDBUF=8192
        stat cache size = 50
        load printers = Yes
        printcap name = /etc/printcap
        printer driver file = /etc/printers.def
        strip dot = No
        character set =
        mangled stack = 50
        coding system =
        client code page = 850
        stat cache = Yes
        domain groups =
        domain admin group =
        domain guest group =
        domain admin users =
        domain guest users =
        machine password timeout = 604800
        add user script =
        delete user script =
        logon script =
        logon path = \\%N\%U\profile
        logon drive =
        logon home = \\%N\%U
        domain logons = No
        os level = 0
        lm announce = Auto
        lm interval = 60
        preferred master = No
        local master = Yes
        domain master = No
        browse list = Yes
        dns proxy = No
        wins proxy = No
        wins server =
        wins support = No
        kernel oplocks = Yes
        ole locking compatibility = Yes
        oplock break wait time = 10
        smbrun = /usr/bin/smbrun
        config file =
        preload =
        lock dir = /var/lock/samba
        default service =
        message command =
        dfree command =
        valid chars =
        remote announce =
        remote browse sync =
        socket address = 0.0.0.0
        homedir map =
        time offset = 0
        unix realname = No
        NIS homedir = No
        panic action =
        comment = Samba Server
        path =
        alternate permissions = No
        revalidate = No
        username =
        guest account = nobody
        invalid users =
        valid users =
        admin users =
        read list =
        write list =
        force user =
        force group =
        read only = Yes
        create mask = 0744
        force create mode = 00
        security mask = 037777777777
        force security mode = 037777777777
        directory mask = 0755
        force directory mode = 00
        directory security mask = 037777777777
        force directory security mode = 037777777777
        guest only = No
        guest ok = No
        only user = No
        hosts allow = 192.168.1.
        hosts deny =
        status = Yes
        max connections = 0
        min print space = 0
        strict sync = No
        sync always = No
        print ok = No
        postscript = No
        printing = bsd
        print command = lpr -r -P%p %s
        lpq command = lpq -P%p
        lprm command = lprm -P%p %j
        lppause command =
        lpresume command =
        queuepause command =
        queueresume command =
        printer name =
        printer driver = NULL
        printer driver location =
        default case = lower
        case sensitive = No
        preserve case = Yes
        short preserve case = Yes
        mangle case = No
        mangling char = ~
        hide dot files = Yes
        delete veto files = No
        veto files =
        hide files =
        veto oplock files =
        map system = No
        map hidden = No
        map archive = Yes
        mangled names = Yes
        mangled map =
        browseable = Yes
        blocking locks = Yes
        fake oplocks = No
        locking = Yes
        mangle locks = Yes
        oplocks = Yes
        level2 oplocks = No
        oplock contention limit = 2
        strict locking = No
        share modes = Yes
        copy =
        include =
        exec =
        postexec =
        root preexec =
        root postexec =
        available = Yes
        volume =
        fstype = NTFS
        set directory = No
        wide links = Yes
        follow symlinks = Yes
        dont descend =
        magic script =
        magic output =
        delete readonly = No
        dos filetimes = No
        dos filetime resolution = No
        fake directory create times = No
 
[homes]
        comment = Home Directories
        read only = No
 
[printers]
        comment = All Printers
        path = /var/spool/samba
        print ok = Yes
        browseable = No

0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
ID: 2779536
The "|" in the command is normally the shift \ key on a PC keyboard. That's a Unixism for pipe the output of one command into the next.


Okay, you've told Samba that the Workgroup is SIS.COM. Is that the workgroup configured into the "Network Neighborhood>Properties" on your windows boxes?
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:emherman
ID: 2782193
You probably get quite a chuckle out of us newbies...

I ran "ps -ef | grep mbd | grep -v grep" and it just returned a command prompt.

Also from the "davidpm" thread, I got on oreilly.com and printed out the troubleshooting section.

When I ping AT the server, I can ping 192.168.1.1 and cow.sis.com... I can also ping localhost and 127.0.0.1... When I go to my Windows NT client and try to ping the server I can ping 192.168.1.1 but when I ping cow.sis.com, it returns "bad IP address cow.sis.com".

As for the Windows boxes, My computer is "OFFICENT" and workgroup is "SIS.COM".

I can also see my "ntserver" when browsing (network neighborhood) from "officent" and the kids computer when it is up. Could my NT server be screwing with me?? (MS technology you know...)

0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:emherman
ID: 2782677
as per oreilly.com (samba), I did a "arp -a" locally at the server(cow). These were the results:

"? (192.168.1.10) at 00:a0:c9:10:35:1b [ether] on eth0"

It seems to indicate a problem (so says the book)

I'm still reading to understand what I did..
0
 
LVL 40

Accepted Solution

by:
jlevie earned 75 total points
ID: 2783255
> I ran "ps -ef | grep mbd | grep -v grep" and it just returned a command prompt.

Means that Samba isn't running. If it were there would have been a couple of lines printed, something sort of like:

    root 13273     1  0   May 04 ?        3:16 bin/nmbd
    root 13271     1  0   May 04 ?        0:00 bin/smbd

which indicates that both Samba daemons (smdbd & nmbd) are running.

I believe you should should have a startup script in /etc/rc.d/init.d (samba or smb, don't remember which RH uses). Try starting samba by invoking the script with a "start" option (e.g. /etc/rc.d/init.d/smb start).

You are also going to need to enable "encrypt passwords" and "smb passwd file" file before you'll be able to access shares from the windows boxes. You'll find that life will be oh so much simpler if you make the windows login name and password the same as the Linux loagin/password (and make sure you use normal, all lowercase Unix usernames). Along with enabling encrypted passwords you'll need to set an SMB encrypted password for each user (smbpasswd -a user password). Any time you change the Samba config you must stop & re-start Samba so that it will see the changes.

The "arp -a" output looks fine to me. It says that your Linux system has seen, and is holding a cached arp entry for, your windows box (192.168.1.10). If that is the only other system on the network (or the only other system Linux has "talked to" recently) that would be the only entry in the arp table.
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:emherman
ID: 2786451
I guess it would help if I start samba....

In RH I can "samba status"... (both were not running) and I entered "samba start" to get it running.

Since I now have NO pride left (thanks for your tact by the way), I may as well ask, "what file do I modify to get samba to start at boot?"

I'm going to post two more questions since I still can't access via telnet, http, or ping using "cow.sis.com" only at the IP address. The other is about getting the rest of Samba set up. I'll try that one myself first.
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:emherman
ID: 2786455
Adjusted points from 50 to 75
0
How your wiki can always stay up-to-date

Quip doubles as a “living” wiki and a project management tool that evolves with your organization. As you finish projects in Quip, the work remains, easily accessible to all team members, new and old.
- Increase transparency
- Onboard new hires faster
- Access from mobile/offline

 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:emherman
ID: 2786456
Thanks for your time put into this...
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
ID: 2786533
If you've used the Samba rpm furnished w/RH as I think you have, you can use linuxconf to arrainge to have Samba started at each boot by going into the "Control>Control panel>Control service activity" and mark samba for "Automatic" "Startup".

I would be quite willing to persue the other issues here if you've not already opened the new questions. I was just trying to solve one problem at a time.

Thank you for your generous compliment and you are quite welcome.
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:emherman
ID: 2786744
Ok.. Instant problem.. I tried to put about 30 web sites on there from my NT server (41MB) and after 17MB it said my disk was full. How do I find how much disk space I have left. I set it up to have ~2GB /usr and ~2GB /usr/src.. (I think). The HD is 6GB total

BTW, I'm setup using "password = server" and my NTSERVER for passwords. I would like to get it to run as a standalone and not be dependant on Microsoft.
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
ID: 2787117
The "df" command will report the states of all mounted file systems. There's no way from here that I can be sure, but probably / doesn't have that much space. The typical Samba set up creates a [homes] share, which points to each user's home dir. Since that is actually /home in a default installation, you way well have run out of space prematurely.

You probably want to create a Samba share that points to where ever you want the htdocs dir to be (and that should be a location with enough free space).


You can set up a local smbpasswd file, set "security = user" and "encrypt passwords = yes" and authenticate directly against Samba. See the previous comment for a bit more. If that's not enough I can elaborate.
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:emherman
ID: 2788229
the results of DF look like:Filesystem           1k-blocks      Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/hda1               101107     76443     19443  80% /
/dev/hda5              2656420   1189344   1332132  47% /usr
/dev/hda8               210000        32    199126   0% /usr/local
/dev/hda6              2656420     65440   2456036   3% /usr/src
/dev/hda9               202220        21    191759   0% /var/spool/lpd  

How can I make the computer use /usr? Do I need /usr/src so big? I was under the impression that /usr/src was for individual user programs.. I am using the defaults set by RH.

0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:emherman
ID: 2788264
oh yeah.. is there a better way to partition this 6GB? I want to install all the RH files so I can know what it has, but use it as a file/web/intranet server. Occasionally, it will be used as a workstation so I can learn the details of that too. Everything I have read on partitioning has been so theoretical and general that I still haven't a clue how to partition correctly. Is there a good resource to read on partitioning a linux box?
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:emherman
ID: 2790562
I set things back to "security = user" and ran encrypted passwords but it keeps telling me my password is incorrect and won't let me log on. I'm obviously doing something wrong. I'm researching at oreilly.com but mabye you'll spot what I have screwed up before I do.. This is my current /etc/smb.conf:

[global]

    workgroup = sis.com
    server string = Samba Server
;   hosts allow = 192.168.1. 192.168.2. 127.
    printcap name = /etc/printcap
    load printers = yes
;   printing = bsd
;  guest account = pcguest
    log file = /var/log/samba/log.%m
    max log size = 50
    security = user
;   password server = <NT-Server-Name>
;   password server = ntserver
;  password level = 8
;  username level = 8
   encrypt passwords = yes
   smb passwd file = /etc/smbpasswd
 
   unix password sync = Yes
   passwd program = /usr/bin/passwd %u
 
   passwd chat = *New*UNIX*password* %n\n *ReType*new*UNIX*password* %n\n *passw
d:*all*authentication*tokens*updated*successfully*
 
;  username map = /etc/smbusers
 
;   include = /etc/smb.conf.%m
 
    socket options = TCP_NODELAY SO_RCVBUF=8192 SO_SNDBUF=8192
;   interfaces = 192.168.12.2/24 192.168.13.2/24
;   remote browse sync = 192.168.3.25 192.168.5.255
;   remote browse sync = 192.168.3.25 192.168.5.255
;   remote announce = 192.168.1.255 192.168.2.44
;   local master = no
;   os level = 33
;   domain master = yes
;   preferred master = yes
;   domain controller = <NT-Domain-Controller-SMBName>
;   domain controller = ntserver
;   domain logons = yes
;   logon script = %m.bat
;   logon script = %U.bat
;   logon path = \\%L\Profiles\%U
; name resolve order = wins lmhosts bcast

;   wins support = yes
;   wins server = w.x.y.z
;   wins proxy = yes
    dns proxy = no

;   unix password sync = no
;   comment = Samba Server
;   encrypt passwords = yes
    map to guest = never
    password level = 0
    null passwords = no
    allow hosts = 192.168.1.
    os level = 0
    preferred master = no
    domain master = no
    wins support = no
    dead time = 0
    debug level = 0
;  preserve case = no
;  short preserve case = no
    default case = lower
;  case sensitive = no
 
#============================ Share Definitions ==============================
[homes]
    comment = Home Directories
    browseable = yes
    writable = yes
    public = no
    allow hosts = 192.168.1.
    only user = no
 

[printers]
    comment = All Printers
    path = /var/spool/samba
    browseable = no
    guest ok = no
    writable = no
    printable = yes
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
ID: 2791145
On the passwords, have you created SMB encrypted passwords for each user with "smbpasswd user users-passwd"? If Samba is going to use encrypted passwords it have to know what the Netbui encrypted password looks like.

As to partitioning. Yes what you'll find will be somewhat theoretical in nature. That's because how you use the system will determine, to a large degree, where you need space. If you are into Linux distribution development, you'd need lots of space in /usr/src because that's where all of the Linux (kernel, drivers, utilities, everything) sources need to be. Ordinarily, just to build a kernel, and maybe to look at the sources to an rpm package or two 120-200Mb would be plenty. Most folks don't put that much in /usr/local as they tend to use rpms that install things into /usr/bin, rather than building from source (which usually defaults to /usr/local).

I never use an rpm for webservers, samba, php, mysql, postgres, and a few other things as I usually want a customized and/or more current version. I don't usually like to mix stuff like that into /usr/local, preferring instead to target it at configure time to /opt. I do build an number of other things that wind up in /usr/local, but in a worst case it usually won't be more than 100-150Mb. My typical partitioning scheme for a pretty large web server and general purpose wkstn winds up something like:

/    1500Mb
/var  500Mb
/opt 2000Mb
/home remainder

But then I tend to have some 500-800Mb of sources in /home at any given time. For a dedicated web server with large databases associated I'd make /opt lots bigger & /home smaller. I like a separate /var (with a fair bit of space for log files) as it changes constantly as the system runs./var might need to be bigger if the system was a mail server. The root filesystem (/) tends to be relatively static and is best on a filesystem by itself. The size shown above has more than enough room for all of the Red Hat distro and plenty of room for things in /usr/local, kernel sources, etc.

Basically, you just have to build a system or two, use it a bit and see where you need space. There isn't a magic formula.
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:emherman
ID: 2802757
Ok. I have much news.. First, gnome died on my linux box and instead of fixing it I just wiped the machine clean and started over. I went with the partitioning scheme you showed and it worked fine. I have about 100MB of graphics and web sites shoved in there in /eric and it seems to work great. I'm going to propose setting this up at a client of mine as a "real world" test. Probably for free right now while I'm still learning.

I still can't get the encrypted passwords bit. I tried about every variation of "smbpasswd user users-passwd" and just kept getting error messages. I also found that "smbpasswd eric" might work but i get this:

[root@cow eric]# smbpasswd eric
New SMB password:
Retype new SMB password:
getsmbfilepwent: malformed password entry (uid not number)
Failed to find entry for user eric.
Failed to change password entry for eric

Finally, I can't get what I think is DNS to work. How can I type "cow.sis.com" for telnet, http, ftp... and get the linux box to show up??
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:emherman
ID: 2802764
Oh. is there a good read on Linux partitioning?
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
ID: 2805994
The proper command to create an SMB password is "smbpasswd -a user password". The "-a" option tells smbpasswd that you want to create (add) a user/password entry to Samba password file. With no option arguments, smbpasswd expects to modify an existing entry (which explains the error shown above)

Who provides the DNS server that's responsible for the sis.com domain? The DNS must have entries for each node in domain and the client machines must be told to use that DNS server(s). If you don't have a DNS server for sis.com (or can't put the entries in it for the "private network", you can still use a "hosts" file on each client to provide the name->IP resolution.

Partitioning disks is mostly a common sense thing. You build a system, look at how big various things are and figure out where you didn't provide sufficient space for what you'll be using the system for. The you build a new system with a new partition layout that reflects what you've learned. After a while you get pretty good at "getimating" how much space you need where.

BTW, more thatn likely it wan't Gnome that died, but rather the Gnome & desktop files in your login directory that got damaged. In a case like that you can delete the desktop files, and they'll get rebuilt at the next login.
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:emherman
ID: 2819467
OK. I got the "smbpasswd -a" part. Do I have to do that every time I have a new user, or can I have samba do that automatically as I add new users?

As for DNS. This network is a isolated LAN of six total computers and a dial-up connection to the Internet. I really only need a computer and a single file server (was NT, soon to be Linux), but use the rest as test platforms. I have been reading and realized that I probably would be better off editing the /etc/hosts file directly instead of running a DNS server..... for now. :-)

As for the partitioning part. Where I am running into confusion is the initial partitioning. Under a w98 platform most people run just one big drive. Under NT things get partitioned as drive c:, d:, e:, etc., and are still general purpose. Under Linux it appears that you have to define your main "folders" and the approximate space needed for them. Can I move these around without starting over if I misconfigure? This concept is just taking a while to sink in..

Finally, I have a second linux box running now but would like to configure it as a firewall... Should I start a new thread?

0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
ID: 2819817
You can tell the system to update the smbpasswd file each time a new user is added or their Linux password changes. The only reason you'd normally use smbpasswd is when you have existing user accounts and those will be also Samba users.

Yes, for a relatively small number of nodes on a relatively static network, using local hosts files is easier and just as effective as a DNS. Set up the Linux box with a "master copy" the hosts file, listing all nodes, and use that to create a windows hosts file. Them simply copy the windows hosts file to each machine.

Yep, disk partitioning can be a confusing issue and there's no single best answer. Late versions of windows (those with FAT32) can have a single giant C: drive. I'm of the opinion that such an arraingement is a very poor choice, but it works fine. NT out of the box, wants a C: drive of not more than 2GB (it's obeying a bios cylinder limit) and other space can be assigned to 2Gb (if using FAT) or larger (if usint NTFS). The NT model is preferable even for windows if you'll do a bit of post installation configuration of the apps. I don't like anything in windows to write any of my data to the C: drive, so I tell every app that it's to use a folder on the D: drive. As a result when windows hoses up and has to be reloaded I don't have to worry about losing any of my data. It's on the D: drive wich the install process doesn't need to touch. The same goes for NT. Unfortunately windows isn't very friendly as to where apps write user data. A lot use "My Documents", whci is normally located on the C: drive, but others may use the program's installation folder. What a mess.

How to slice up a disk for use by Linux depends on what the system will be used for. Personally I don't see any advantage to separate / & /usr filesystems unless you intend to built your own statically linked copies of utilities needed to repair a damaged /usr filesystem. The copies furnished with Linux are all dynamically linked and if there's a problem with /usr it's most likely that those utilities won't work anyway. So I dispense with separate / & /usr partitions and make other partitions for the usual space hogs (/var, /home, etc). I like to try to keep / as quiet a filesystem as possible, so I make other filesystem if needed for apps that routinely do lot's of writing into places other than /var & /home. That reduces the chance that the / filesystem might get screwed up in a system crash or power outage. I can always fix any other filesystem (or re-load it from backup) if I've got a running system... Plan for disasters...

 For example if it was to be a dedicated (busy) web server, you'd need a relatively small root  partition, a big /var partition (for log files) and a partition to hold the htdocs and possibly databases. Similar rules would apply for a file server with the big area being used for /home. Partition sizes would be like:

  /       - 600-800Mb
  /var    - 200-500Mb
  /home   - everything remaining

A more general use machine (or workstation) would likely have a lot more things loaded into usr & friends and accordingly need more space there, perhaps 1000-2000Mb. It wouldn't need a very large var filesystem, 100-200Mb would be plentiful.

After setting up a system or two, following those or similar guidelines, you'll pretty soon get a pretty good idea of about how big you need the various partitions and how may others you might find appropriate. This learning experience is a case of needing to "plan on throwing one away". You just about have to install a system to know how to install the system. Short of "backup, repartition, & restore" you can't change the size of a partition(s) once the system is installed and running.
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:emherman
ID: 2835476
I have changed things around a bit. I moved the 6GB drive into another machine and installed RH Linux (naming it cow)as a server. I installed a spare 2GB drive into the old computer (better equipment) and made it a Gnome Worksation (which is better gnome or kde?). Both times I let RH make the partitions. I'm going to wrap this up but would like to thank you for getting me up and running.

Talk to you another time.

Thanks,

Eric
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
ID: 2842361
Personally I prefer KDE as I find it to be a bit faster and more mature. Gnome is a bit easier to customize, but that's never been all that important to me as I do almost everything from a termial window. A person that prefers to use the Gui's will probably be more interested in modifying the desktop and may well prefer Gnome.
0

Featured Post

Highfive Gives IT Their Time Back

Highfive is so simple that setting up every meeting room takes just minutes and every employee will be able to start or join a call from any room with ease. Never be called into a meeting just to get it started again. This is how video conferencing should work!

Join & Write a Comment

I have seen several blogs and forum entries elsewhere state that because NTFS volumes do not support linux ownership or permissions, they cannot be used for anonymous ftp upload through the vsftpd program.   IT can be done and here's how to get i…
Note: for this to work properly you need to use a Cross-Over network cable. 1. Connect both servers S1 and S2 on the second network slots respectively. Note that you can use the 1st slots but usually these would be occupied by the Service Provide…
This video discusses moving either the default database or any database to a new volume.
You have products, that come in variants and want to set different prices for them? Watch this micro tutorial that describes how to configure prices for Magento super attributes. Assigning simple products to configurable: We assigned simple products…

758 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

18 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now