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Terminal Services NT4.0 vs Win2K?  Need comparison info

Posted on 2000-03-21
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Last Modified: 2010-04-13
Does anyone know where I can get a good comparison of the difference in features between the 2 products for NT 4.0 Terminal Server vs. Terminal Services with Win2000?  Microsoft has TONS of info, but nothing compact and easy to figure out.  I think we're going to have to use Terminal Server/Services but I don't know which one to go to.  We're a very small company and have an application that we don't want to replicate data between two small offices so we thought using TS for 6-7 users would be a good idea.  We're a NT4.0 shop - not going to migrate for a long time since we just did before Y2K.  But if TS in Win2000 is THAT much better and I shouldn't be using anything else, I'd like to know.  I have to make a good case though to mgmt and that's why I'm looking for info.  Can anyone help?  
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Question by:jrddcd
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by:tregrep
ID: 2643587
Don't know any pages other than Microsoft comparing these products, but WK2 TS offers som new features like
-Remote server managment
-Load balancing
-Clipboard (cut, copy & paste)
and probably other. To get these features in NT4 TS you have to use Citrix Metaframe on top of TS. If you only need one server with one fairly static application, NT4 TS will suffice.
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Lermitte earned 50 total points
ID: 2644310
There are several key enhancements to Terminal Services in Windows 2000.
Terminal Services is now a configurable service and is fully integrated with the Windows 2000 Server kernel. This means they can either be installed at setup or added or removed via the "Add/Remove Programs" tool under "Add/Remove Windows Components." The need for separate Terminal Services Service Packs has also been eliminated. To ensure that the proper performance profile for the Windows 2000 Server is preserved, users can modify the server Performance Options right-clicking on "My Computer" and choosing the Advanced tab in the System Properties dialog box. Administrators can choose to prioritize either "Applications" (Terminal Server serving up applications) or "Background Services" (regular client/server applications server or file and print server) to ensure that the installation of Terminal Services does not adversely affect file and print or server background process performance.
Terminal Services now includes two different install modes: Remote Administration and Application Server. Administrators can choose which mode they would like to use Terminal Services in at the time of setup.
Terminal Services has also been integrated with the Network Load Balancing (formerly Windows Load Balancing) service in Windows 2000, offering customers additional built-in scalability when setting up farms of computers running Terminal Server. The 16- and 32-bit RDP clients for Windows included with Windows 2000 Server also have major enhancements: brush and persistent caching to improve performance; shadowing and remote control of one client session by another for administration and trouble-shooting; automatic loading of drivers and configuration support for local printers attached to Windows-based terminals or PC clients; improved 56-bit or 128-bit (formerly 40-bit or 128-bit) encryption between client and server; and support for cut and paste between local windows and the RDP remote session.
Another important new feature is multilanguage support, which allows any RDP client to interoperate in a multilanguage fashion with any computer running Terminal Services. In the earlier version (Windows NT Server 4.0 Terminal Server Edition), localization of the Terminal Server was in individual languages and required separate servers for multiple language support. With Windows 2000 Server, any client can talk to any server.
Additional changes have been made to the administrative tools for Terminal Services, the Terminal Services Connection Configuration and the Terminal Services Manager. The Terminal Services Connection Configuration tool is now a Microsoft Management Console component; therefore, its GUI is more closely integrated with the other Windows 2000 administrative tools and can be extended by third parties.
Lastly, there is support in Windows 2000 Server for a small set of new Terminal Services APIs. More information is available in the white paper “Using and Understanding APIs for Terminal Server.”

Mario
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