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Reading files from different OS

Posted on 2000-03-22
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Last Modified: 2010-04-20
I have two separate hard drives, on the C drive i have windows 95 (sorry.. :)  ) and i have just installed linux on the D drive. I know Windows does not even know the D drive exists, but i was wondering if there was a way for me to access my files that are on the C drive from linux, on my D drive. files such as mp3s, for instance... Thanks a lot!
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Question by:peas
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7 Comments
 
LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:mcrider
ID: 2648953
Yes, you can mount it in your /etc/fstab file...

For example:

Create a directory call /dos_c_drive

Then put something like this in your /etc/fstab and reboot linux:

/dev/hda1 /dos_c_drive msdos defaults 1 1

Note that the first argument "/dev/hda1" is the device that points to the C drive... Use whatever device points to you C drive...


Cheers!®©
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Author Comment

by:peas
ID: 2651833
Adjusted points from 5 to 10
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Author Comment

by:peas
ID: 2651834
Thanks a lot for the response mcrider; honestly, i didnt think anyone would reply! however i think i did what you said to do, but it didnt seem to work...
may it have to do with what you said was the "device that points to the C drive", ie. /dev/hda1
how do i find out what device points to the c drive? im sorry; im totally a novice here!! if you can help more, thanks a lot, but if you dont, thanks anyway for the response, i appreciate it! at least i have something to work with!
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Expert Comment

by:orz012999
ID: 2652400
I don't think anyones going to give you a straight answer for only 10 points.  Even though it is simple to access other drives.
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Accepted Solution

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Reinier earned 10 total points
ID: 2652799
Sure, some-one will answer. What are you going to do with those points anyway?

Please change that /etc/fstab line to:

/dev/hda1 /dos_c_drive vfat defaults 0 0

The "vfat" will make you see long filenames (see "man mount" and "man fstab") and the two zero's tell not to include this filesystem in backups (see "man dump") and not to check this filesystem at boot (see "man fsck"). You are free to choose any other mount point instead of /dos_c_drive, but make sure the directory you choose exists before your try to mount.

Now, as root, issue a "mount /dos_c_drive". Only after that you will be able to cd to /dos_c_drive and see the contents of "C:".
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LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:Reinier
ID: 2652828
Oh, yes, and from now on the C: drive will be mounted every time you boot linux. If you don't want that you can change "defaults" to "defaults,noauto".

Do you have other users on that system?
If you want all users to be able to mount C: you could add "user" to this option field. For further options see "man mount". Go read about the "uid=xxx", "gid=xxx" and "noexec" options.
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Author Comment

by:peas
ID: 2653407
Thanks a lot rainier! I really appreciate you taking the time to help out

I dont have other users on there, but i want to look into the permissions stuff anyway.

Thanks again, also, mcrider!
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