?
Solved

FTP Permissioning

Posted on 2000-03-24
3
Medium Priority
?
360 Views
Last Modified: 2008-03-06
I am running an FTP server on RH6.  I have 2 questions.
I created a directory called upload. I have permissioned the Dir so that everyone has 'rwx' access (chmod 777).  However when I ftp into it I still can not upload files to that dir. It tells me upload access is denied.
Assuming I can get that working, then my second question would be:

How would I give just one user write or upload permission to
the upload dir on my ftp server (/home/ftp/upload)? Would have to make him a new group and do a chgrp on the directory??

Thanks
0
Comment
Question by:jkipp_66
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
3 Comments
 
LVL 4

Accepted Solution

by:
kiffney earned 600 total points
ID: 2655858
If you have an /etc/ftpaccess file, you need a line in it that says something like

upload /home/ftp /incoming yes ftp ftp 0666

in which you should replace /home/ftp with the actual ftp 'root' directory, and under /home/ftp you should have an incoming/ directory with permissions 0777.  I think you also need to have an 'ftp' user created.  the ftpaccess and ftpd man pages have more details, but I think this is the part you might be missing.

The way wu-ftpd (which is what I think that version of redhat uses) handles users by default is it chroots the ftp user to his 'home directory', so the 'ftp' user winds up in the /home/ftp directory (which looks like the only directory since he's chrooted), and the user 'joe' winds up in /home/joe, where he has whatever permissions the upload command gives him.  I could be wrong here though since it's been a while since I messed with this.  
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
ID: 2656178
Actually wu-ftp doesn't chroot to the user's dir. Ordinary users (as listed in the passwd file) have normal rights with respect to uploading/downloading. If they can read/write to a dir while directly logged in they can upload/download to those dirs from ftp.

When you set up anonymous ftp, wu-ftp does chroot to the anon ftp dir.

As noted /etc/ftpaccess can be used to limit/grant ftp privs. You can see what can be done by looking at "man ftpaccess"

0
 
LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:jyu_88
ID: 2657249
For fine-tuned config, You'd better off with proftpd. It has Apache-like directory directives to control permission. Also, users will access the sites with the same rights as OS user (so, you can tweak UNIX-style file/directory permission to your like), and it is easy to turn the chroot on for all users, one single directive in the main config file: DefaultRoot ~.
www.proftpd.org
0

Featured Post

What Is Blockchain Technology?

Blockchain is a technology that underpins the success of Bitcoin and other digital currencies, but it has uses far beyond finance. Learn how blockchain works and why it is proving disruptive to other areas of IT.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

I am a long time windows user and for me it is normal to have spaces in directory and file names. Changing to Linux I found myself frustrated when I moved my windows data over to my new Linux computer. The problem occurs when at the command line.…
Introduction We as admins face situation where we need to redirect websites to another. This may be required as a part of an upgrade keeping the old URL but website should be served from new URL. This document would brief you on different ways ca…
This demo shows you how to set up the containerized NetScaler CPX with NetScaler Management and Analytics System in a non-routable Mesos/Marathon environment for use with Micro-Services applications.
How to Install VMware Tools in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.4 (RHEL 6.4) Step-by-Step Tutorial
Suggested Courses
Course of the Month10 days, 12 hours left to enroll

765 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question