FTP Permissioning

I am running an FTP server on RH6.  I have 2 questions.
I created a directory called upload. I have permissioned the Dir so that everyone has 'rwx' access (chmod 777).  However when I ftp into it I still can not upload files to that dir. It tells me upload access is denied.
Assuming I can get that working, then my second question would be:

How would I give just one user write or upload permission to
the upload dir on my ftp server (/home/ftp/upload)? Would have to make him a new group and do a chgrp on the directory??

Thanks
jkipp_66Asked:
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kiffneyConnect With a Mentor Commented:
If you have an /etc/ftpaccess file, you need a line in it that says something like

upload /home/ftp /incoming yes ftp ftp 0666

in which you should replace /home/ftp with the actual ftp 'root' directory, and under /home/ftp you should have an incoming/ directory with permissions 0777.  I think you also need to have an 'ftp' user created.  the ftpaccess and ftpd man pages have more details, but I think this is the part you might be missing.

The way wu-ftpd (which is what I think that version of redhat uses) handles users by default is it chroots the ftp user to his 'home directory', so the 'ftp' user winds up in the /home/ftp directory (which looks like the only directory since he's chrooted), and the user 'joe' winds up in /home/joe, where he has whatever permissions the upload command gives him.  I could be wrong here though since it's been a while since I messed with this.  
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jlevieCommented:
Actually wu-ftp doesn't chroot to the user's dir. Ordinary users (as listed in the passwd file) have normal rights with respect to uploading/downloading. If they can read/write to a dir while directly logged in they can upload/download to those dirs from ftp.

When you set up anonymous ftp, wu-ftp does chroot to the anon ftp dir.

As noted /etc/ftpaccess can be used to limit/grant ftp privs. You can see what can be done by looking at "man ftpaccess"

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jyu_88Commented:
For fine-tuned config, You'd better off with proftpd. It has Apache-like directory directives to control permission. Also, users will access the sites with the same rights as OS user (so, you can tweak UNIX-style file/directory permission to your like), and it is easy to turn the chroot on for all users, one single directive in the main config file: DefaultRoot ~.
www.proftpd.org
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