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Power saving in linux

One thing I miss about Windoze(it's the only thing!)is its power saving function.   One can wind down the hard drive, cpu fan, case fan and monitor with one option on the start menu.   I know one can use hdparm under linux to spin down the hard drive, but even this is a bit unweldy and the system bios seems to have no effect.  Is there anything one can do, or use. to get anywhere near Windoze for power saving when the systems not in use?

Many thanks  
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cliffhanger121599
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cliffhanger121599
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jlevieCommented:
Linux in general supports power saving via apm. It gets installed by default on laptops, but at least with RedHat it doesn't by default get installed on desktop systems. You can add it with rpm and the man page for apm will tell you more about it.
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EatEmAndSmileCommented:
APM is included in Slackware 7.0 by default, but I've always thought power saving should be controlled at hardware level. I recommend setting it up right in the BIOS and well... Thanks God you can't configure (and mess with) anything through a couple clicks in menus.
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cliffhanger121599Author Commented:
many thanks
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EatEmAndSmileCommented:
Reminder: In the BIOS Setup (You know, hit DEL at boot time) you can set every power saving feature your BIOS supports. I'm not a big fan of power saving, but this is cool because your opoerational system doesn't even have to know about it.

 Good luck!
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jlevieCommented:
Every document that I've seen so far says to use linux apm if you want power management. The quote from the Debian install manual (the only one I have handy at the moment) says,

"If your motherboard provides Advanced Power Management (APM), configure it so that power management is controlled by APM, Disable the doze, standby, suspend, nap, and sleepmodes, and disable the hard disk's power down timer. Linux can take over control of these modes, and can do ab better job of power-management than the BIOS."

My experiences with laptops bears out that reccommendation. I've seen a nuumber of lockups/crashes if you try to mix the bios features and apm power management.
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cliffhanger121599Author Commented:
Thanks for making that clear.   I have not tried APM(not loaded), the modes available in the bios which i have set seem to have no affect whilst in Linux.
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jlevieCommented:
"apm" works pretty well, and I think it gives you more control than a bios solution. It's for certain that it's more knowledgeable about what Linux does and needs that a bios routine that was written with only window in mind.
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