Solved

Video Capture Card

Posted on 2000-03-29
5
274 Views
Last Modified: 2010-12-01
I recently became interested in purchasing a video capture card, but I know almost nothing about them. What are the good brands? What are the things I should look for?

Most cards can capture video at only 30 FPS; should I look for one that can do 60 FPS? Do I need a VCR in order to record from TV? What would be a good price? Where should I shop for one, in general computer stores like CompUSA and Fry's or on the web?

I would appreciate several recommendations please.
0
Comment
Question by:armor_king
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
5 Comments
 
LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:compmania
ID: 2667440
I believe the V3 3500 does a great job doing capturing.
You will not need a VCR.
Fry's would be my choice, it is good to search the web and compare prices.
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:sdewerth
ID: 2667579
You do not need a video capture card that captures any higher than 30 fps.  A typical movie is projected at 30fps.  It seems to be a rather popular belief that more is better in this category.  However, what would be the point a a 60pfs capture of something that is only projecting at 30fps..two of the same frame back to back?  What you really need to look for is a capture card that will capture the resolution you are looking for at the speed you are looking for.  Typically, most of the consumer cards might only capture a 320 x 240 image at 30fps.  If you need a full screen image at 800 x 600, you are going to get some blockiness as pixels are blocked to make up for the extra resolution.  To get a good quality professional capture that will do the higher resolutions, look at at least 500 dolars or higher(into the thousands).  It really depends on your intended use.  I have a WinTv by Hauppage and it suits me fine, but I won't be producing any Oscar quality home movies.

Scot
0
 

Author Comment

by:armor_king
ID: 2668427
Actually, sdewerth, one of the biggest uses I have planned for my video capture card is recording movies for a PlayStation video game.  That particular game runs at 60 fps, so in this case, it would apply.  You make a good argument about most movies running at 30 fps or less, though.  I remember hearing somewhere that movies are recorded at only 24 fps, or was that only animated movies?
0
 
LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:mitrakis
ID: 2668841
I'm using a Winnov Videum AV PCI.
Very good grabber.
It's possible to install more than one card into your PC without any conflicts.
This way you can record/view several video signals simultaneously (most grabbers are unable to do so due to driver restrictions).
Furthermore, it has three video inputs on board:
- s-video
- composite
- MXC (video and audio combined in "one" cable)

You can use hardware compression as well.
This is something the Hauppauge card isn't capable of (uses software compressors/codecs).

And yes, you're right concerning movie fps.
You're watching TV at approx. 25fps; quite enough :)

Have a look at http://www.winnov.com for further details on the suggested grabber card.

Best regards
-Stavi-
0
 
LVL 2

Accepted Solution

by:
lgrover earned 100 total points
ID: 2670439
There is no need to capture at faster than 30FPS.  Movies are generally recorded at 24FPS, broadcast video is recorded at 30FPS and time-lapse is <10FPS.  The best capture cards generally capture full-motion (30FPS) video at 640x480 resolution.  If you want video of even higher quality, you can opt for a digital camcorder for home movies or a digital VCR (mini-DV) for recording digital video.  Expect to pay at least $1500 for the camcorder or $3500 for the DVCR.  For something more reasonable, go to ebay.com or auctionwatch.com and search for "video capture."  MOst of what you will find are standard consumer <$250 models that will not offer near broadcast quality.  For better quality, opt for the Hollywood 2 at about $999 new or <$500 used on auction sites.  For true broadcast quality video, you will need a professional card like the Targa line.  These sell for about $1500+ USED.  For personal use, a consumer or mid-range card is sufficient.  If you are only interested in recording TV broadcasts, buy a TV tuner with digital VCR software.  This will generally run $50-$200 and can record video of fairly high quality.  Be aware, however, that 30 minutes of full motion, near broadcast quality, MPEG video takes up a LOT of hard disk space.  Hope this helps.

Lenny
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: SSL Checker

Scans your site and returns information about your SSL implementation and certificate. Helpful for debugging and validating your SSL configuration.

One of a set of tools we are providing to everyone as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

What do we know about Legacy Video Conferencing? - Full IT support needed! - Complicated systems at outrageous prices! - Intense training required! Highfive believes we need to embrace a new alternative.
In the modern office, employees tend to move around the workplace a lot more freely. Conferences, collaborative groups, flexible seating and working from home require a new level of mobility. Technology has not only changed the behavior and the expe…
Michael from AdRem Software explains how to view the most utilized and worst performing nodes in your network, by accessing the Top Charts view in NetCrunch network monitor (https://www.adremsoft.com/). Top Charts is a view in which you can set seve…
In this brief tutorial Pawel from AdRem Software explains how you can quickly find out which services are running on your network, or what are the IP addresses of servers responsible for each service. Software used is freeware NetCrunch Tools (https…

691 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question