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paren or not paren

Posted on 2000-03-30
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Last Modified: 2010-05-02
Can anyone tell me the difference between:
If (x = 0) Then

and

If x = 0 Then

someone told me that there was a difference. If there is, then when would you use one over the other?
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Question by:buyer
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12 Comments
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:riduce
ID: 2670756
here is you're answer
y + x * 8 = 80
y + (x * 8) = 52

0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:riduce
ID: 2670760
here is you're answer
y + x * 8 = 80
y + (x * 8) = 52

0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:riduce
ID: 2670768
here is you're answer
y + x * 8 = 80
y + (x * 8) = 52

0
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LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:riduce
ID: 2670776
oops sorry for the tripple message
0
 
LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:BarryTice
ID: 2670783
The only difference I'm aware of is ease of reading.

There could be less certainty with something like the following:

If X = 0 And Y = 1 Then

and

If (X = 0) And (Y = 1) Then

Without the parenthesis, VB could interpret as

If X = (0 And Y)

and get results you aren't expecting. (I don't honestly know how VB responds in this case. I always use parenthesis in these kinds of cases to avoid ambiguity. But, then again, I'm one of those bastards who always comments my code, too.)

With the simple expression in your example, though, there shouldn't be a functional difference, I don't think.

-- b.r.t.
0
 

Author Comment

by:buyer
ID: 2670792
Yeah, I know about that. That doesnt answer the question for comparison though. Im using x = 0 and (x = 0) in an if then else statement.
0
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:DrDelphi
ID: 2670803
There are two reasons for this.

1. if (X=0)=Boolean
 
For example:
   List1.enabled=(x=0)

2. if you take 5+2+7-3+10=?
 
   a.(5+2)+(7-3)+10=21
   b. 5+(2+7)-(3+10)=1
 
The grouping is critical.

Good luck!!
       
0
 

Author Comment

by:buyer
ID: 2670821
Again DrDelphi - you are explaining addition. Yeah, I know about this. I am not adding, subtracting, etc anything. I am comparing.
If (x = 0) Then
....
and

If x = 0 Then
....
What is the difference here?
0
 
LVL 6

Accepted Solution

by:
DrDelphi earned 200 total points
ID: 2670831
x=0 is a mathematical expression

(x=0) is treated as a codition to either be met or not, hence a boolean. I thought I made that clear last time.

0
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:DrDelphi
ID: 2670841
also, in this particular case there is no real difference.... but for giggles try this:

x=5

debug.print (x=0)


0
 
LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:gcs001
ID: 2670871
Funny enough debug.print x = 0 also displays False, so it seems that both x = 0 and (x = 0) result in a Boolean value depending of course on the context it's used in.
0
 

Author Comment

by:buyer
ID: 2670882
Thanks
0

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