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NT Service priority

My question is basically simple - do programs running as services under Windows NT 4 run at a higher priority than programs running normally?

We have a program that sits in the background, looping around, checking some values in a database every second or so. Sometimes it needs to run as a service, sometimes as a normal program. So we have a module for each, with the appropriate code in the service module to register it and so forth - but the REAL code is all identical. The problem is, when we run the normal program, it takes about 10% CPU - fine, about what we expected. But the service, when started, settles on around 80% CPU - yet they're both executing the same code. We're pretty lost - any suggestions?
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tofff
Asked:
tofff
1 Solution
 
NickRepinCommented:
Call GetPriorityClass and GetThreadPriority in both cases to be sure about the priorities.
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NickRepinCommented:
Also GetThreadPriorityBoost.
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tofffAuthor Commented:
Thanks, but I don't WANT to boost any thread's priority...I want the service thread to run at the same priority/CPU usage as the normal program. Through third-party applications, it SEEMS as though both threads when they run have teh same priority...but I'm not sure.
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jkrCommented:
>>do programs running as services under Windows NT 4 run at
>>a higher priority than programs running normally?

The answer to this very question is: No, they don't - you can easily check this by viewing the process' (base) priority using the task manager.

However, a service faces some other ramifications that a 'normal' program doesn't, e.g. SCM control requests (wich all require calling 'SetServiceStatus()'), security checks and so on.

A more specific answer to the problem that you're facing requires some more information about what the service/program actually does, so feel free to ask!
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