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Click and rotate?

Ok, here is what I am trying to do. I am sure you have all played rts(real
time strategy) games, where you click on one unit, and then click on another
unit, and the first one turns toward the second, and starts walking. I am
trying to do a similar thing. What I really need help on is this. I know the
x,y location of the 2 objects, but how do I get the angle between the two? I
have tried using some stuff, but It doesn't work :-(. Could anyone put me on
the right track? I understand trig, so if you use those functions I can
follow you.
Jesse
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graphix_man
Asked:
graphix_man
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1 Solution
 
guyssCommented:
assuming (x1,y1) is bigger than x,y
(otherwise you must use absolute values)

what I propose is the following method:
x1-x will give you the X distance between the points,
y1-y will give you the Y between the points.

now i build a right angle triangle
where one angle is 90 degrees.
and two lengths are known
to get the angles:

(x1-x)/(y1-y)=(a)/(90-a)

so just compute (x1-x)*(y1-y) into z
and you angle is either 90*z/z+1
or 90 minus that.

try to draw it out, and it'll be clearer.
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graphix_manAuthor Commented:
I follow you up
=(a)/(90-a), cause I did the same thing. What does a/90-a mean? also what is a defined as?


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guyssCommented:
well, when you have a right angle triangle the ratio of the two sidies of the triangle is the SAME as the ratio
for the two angles, and the two angles
are x and 180-90-x which equals 90-x.
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3rsrichardCommented:
If one is at X1,Y1  and the other is at X2,Y2 then you could use;

float line1, line2;
double angle;

line1 = (float)X2 - (float)X1;
line2 = (float)Y2 - (float)Y1;

angle = atan(line1/line2);

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3rsrichardCommented:
Heres a console example, and remember that the angle will be in radians (not degrees).


#include <math.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <errno.h>

void main( void )
{
   double x1, x2, y;

   printf( "Enter a real number: " );
   scanf( "%lf", &x1 );
   y = atan( x1 );
   printf( "Arctangent of %f: %f\n", x1, y );
   printf( "Enter a second real number: " );
   scanf( "%lf", &x2 );
   y = atan2( x1, x2 );
   printf( "Arctangent of %f / %f: %f\n", x1, x2, y );
}
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ntdragonCommented:
sorry if i'm trying to say something that already have been said

object 1:(x1,y1)
object 2:(x2,y2)

i"ll give a math formula
x=|x1-x2|//modul i mean it have to be >0
y=|y1-y2|//modul i mean it have to be >0
tan(alpha)=y/x
alpha=arctan(y/x)

don't forget to use float's or casting to floats that you won't get your numbers rounded
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graphix_manAuthor Commented:
I have this code:
            if(xmatrix<0)
            {xmatrix=(-xmatrix);}
            if(ymatrix<0)
            {ymatrix=(-ymatrix);}
            float tantest;
            tantest=ymatrix/xmatrix;
      

            double test=atan(tantest);
            test=test*(180/PI);
That I got from looking at the posts. Is this correct, in that is spits out the angle between the 2 points? If so I think 3drich gets the points. If not whoever can fix this up wins.
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ozoCommented:
Why are you taking the absolute value of xmatrix and ymatrix?  What do you mean by "angle between the 2 points"?
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3rsrichardCommented:
What you have is OK.
You don't need to use only positive values, atan works for negative as well.

You need to consider that point 2 could be right/left or up/down from point 1.

#include <math.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <errno.h>

void main( void )
{
   double x, y, angle;

   printf( "Enter a real number x: " );
   scanf( "%lf", &x );
 
   printf( "Enter a second real number y: " );
   scanf( "%lf", &y );
   angle = atan2( x, y );
   printf( "Arctangent of %f / %f: %f\n", x, y, angle );

   printf( "Arctangent of %f / %f: %f\n", x, y, (angle*180/3.14159) );

}


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