Go Premium for a chance to win a PS4. Enter to Win

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 257
  • Last Modified:

log on another machine for my mail

If I log onto another computer on the network. I get an error message that says,
"Unable to open your default e-mail folders. You do not have permission to log on."
Then the next message is
"Would you like to open your default file system folder instead."

So I right click on the outlook icon on the desktop and go to properties and in the Services tab. Clicking Microsoft Exchange Server and looking at the properties....under mailbox it has a different users name (instead of the user loggin in).
Is there a setting on the server or something that needs to be adjusted.
0
chicabow
Asked:
chicabow
  • 17
  • 12
  • 6
  • +1
1 Solution
 
slink9Commented:
The setting that needs to be changed is in the Mail settings.  I have not seen anything that will allow multiple users (at least not on 95/98) to use the same machine and receive email on that machine.  The different settings could be achieved by using different profiles in your settings and prompting for the profile to use when starting Outlook.
0
 
slink9Commented:
You can set up different profiles and select which is the default, etc under Control Panel - Mail - Show profiles.  This will allow you to add new profiles which will check different email accounts on the exchange server.
0
 
chicabowAuthor Commented:
I should not have to edit anything on the client machines.
All the mail is stored on the exchange server so why does it matter?
0
Configuration Guide and Best Practices

Read the guide to learn how to orchestrate Data ONTAP, create application-consistent backups and enable fast recovery from NetApp storage snapshots. Version 9.5 also contains performance and scalability enhancements to meet the needs of the largest enterprise environments.

 
slink9Commented:
The setup on the client machines controls which mailbox is accessed by Outlook.  You can give access to another mailbox and have both open using the same profile, also.  I would consider different profiles the better alternative, though.
0
 
chicabowAuthor Commented:
What I want is for each user to be able to access there mail on any machine.
Since the mail sits on the server, there should be no problems.
0
 
slink9Commented:
No problem if each user has their own profile set up.  Are you on 95,98,2000,NT for your workstation?
0
 
Neo_mvpsCommented:
What you are after is called roaming profiles.  See http://www.slipstick.com/exs/olroam.htm for more information about the subject.
0
 
slink9Commented:
Can you do roaming profiles in anything other than NT or 2000?
0
 
chicabowAuthor Commented:
First of all, I use Windows 98 as the clients.
Roaming files?  what does that do?
0
 
Neo_mvpsCommented:
slink9: Yes.

chicabow: More or less it means that the HKEY_Current_User registry hive is kept on the server.  This way a person can logon to any other machine and their settings follow them.
0
 
chicabowAuthor Commented:
sounds cool...
how come we need to get this piece of software...
does it not come with exchange?
0
 
slink9Commented:
You have roaming profiles already.  It is a setting that I am unfamiliar with (obviously since I didn't know this worked with Win98 clients).  A good book on NT Server will help you out with roaming profiles.
0
 
coreywCommented:
On a Win95/98 machine, a new profile must be setup for each user.  To do so,
1. Right-click on the Outlook icon and select Properties.
2. Click Add
3. Fill in the information for the new profile.
4. After profile has been created, in the "When Starting Microsoft Windows Messaging Use This Profile" combo box, change the profile name to your own.

**If launching Outlook still reports the same error, then...
1. Go to the profile properties again
2. Select Properties on the Microsoft Exchange Server
3. On the Advanced tab, there is a combobox labeled "Logon Network Security".  Set it to "<none>"
4. Click OK and launch Outlook again.  This will allow you to logon to the Exchange server.
0
 
chicabowAuthor Commented:
I should not have to do this.
One of our clients has over 100 computers and if they log on any other computer there mail comes up.
I doubt that there is a profile on each computer of all the employees.
0
 
coreywCommented:
Everyone that logs into Outlook MUST have an outlook profile (a) on that machine OR (b) has floating profiles on the server and their Outlook profile travels with them.

If you do not also have an Outlook profile (locally stored or floating) you will not be able to log into Outlook on that that machine.
0
 
chicabowAuthor Commented:
I should not have to edit any of the client computers.
I know coorporate companies with well over 1000 computers and well there isn't all these profiles set on each computer.
0
 
Neo_mvpsCommented:
chicabow: The roaming profiles are setup at the time a machine is setup/imaged.  The hard part is getting to that stage in an existing network.
0
 
coreywCommented:
The answer to your question is roaming profiles.  NO DOUBT.
0
 
chicabowAuthor Commented:
So that's my solution?

Neo_mvps: so how do I set it up on an exisiting network?
0
 
coreywCommented:
From my understanding, roaming profiles are kind of a pain.  You really need to decide if it is in the best interest of the constituents to do it.  It is the answer to your question, but OWA (Outlook Web Access) may also be a very suitable solution and much easier to implement.
0
 
Neo_mvpsCommented:
Yes on the solution and...

The link supplied above at slipstick has quite a few links on the subject, but in a nutshell...

http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q148/5/95.asp

Just to let you know... I (we) support 3,000 users on Win9x (ug...) and we had to visit each and every machine because of time contrainst on deploying Exchange/Outlook.  (Took 5 support people 3 weekends to convert everyone over.)



0
 
Neo_mvpsCommented:
coreyw:  Roaming profiles are a dream come true and easy to support under Windows NT/Windows 2K because the support is built in.

The problem is Win9x was not designed this way from the ground up and is a nuisance to first implement. (Hence the line when you first setup/image a pc.)

As for the OWA - Not bad when you want browser access to the mail but about half of my clients complain that it isn't user friendly or not as powerful as the full client. (Personally, I love it when I have to do remote work because I don't have to configure a machine for yours truly and/or kick a user out of all applications when I want to review my mail from anywhere in the building.  Just the basic... can I borrow you machine for a sec. <g>)
0
 
chicabowAuthor Commented:
So the link you just mentioned.
Is that the best one to use.
Since I have all the users and everything do I still have to recreate the users to get this roaming feature working?
0
 
Neo_mvpsCommented:
Yes on the link...

I would love to say yes... but I would advise that you read the article first to see how well it applies to your current network setup. (ie. I have run across setups where the machines do not logon to the domain to save on licensing costs.)
0
 
chicabowAuthor Commented:
Well it does apply to my network with one exception.
The first step say to choose User Profile Editor.
I don't have that.
I am using Windows NT 4.0
I cannot do the first step.
0
 
Neo_mvpsCommented:
I thought you had Win9x clients?  If you do, then scroll down to the bottom of the article because that first section deals with setting up Windows NT users from the domain controller.
0
 
chicabowAuthor Commented:
Oh I see...
Yeah I only have Windows 98 clients, does that mean I skip the first part?
0
 
Neo_mvpsCommented:
Yes.
0
 
chicabowAuthor Commented:
I must be missing something here.
Where on that sheet am I suppose to begin?
0
 
Neo_mvpsCommented:
Enabling multiple users to personalize their settings on Windows 95
At the Microsoft Exchange client computer, in the Control Panel, choose Passwords. The Passwords dialog box appears.


Choose the User Profiles property page.


Select the second option which specifies that users can customize their desktop settings. The first option under User Profile Settings is selected by default. The second option is not required.

0
 
chicabowAuthor Commented:
That setting is already set.
Anything else?
0
 
Neo_mvpsCommented:
Specifying the path to a Windows NT or Windows 95 roving user's profile
In the Administrative Tools group, choose User Manager for Domains. The User Manager dialog box appears.


Double-click the user account for the roving user.


Choose the Profile button.


In the User Profile Path box, type the UNC path to the .USR file you created in the last procedure. Include the name of the .USR file. This step should be ignored for Windows 95 roving users.


Under the Home Directory box, select the Connect To option and type the drive letter and path to the home server where the roving user's profile is located. In case of Windows 95 roving users, this directory will be empty until after the user logs in and then logs out of the domain. At that time, the user profile will be copied to the Server from the Windows 95 workstation.

0
 
chicabowAuthor Commented:
Ok I see a copy and paste job here.
So I am suppose to skip the 3rd line....
In the User Profile Path box, type the UNC path to the .USR file ....

Well if I had the previous setting right...and I don't do anything here....What do I do?
0
 
Neo_mvpsCommented:
You would do the last part where you select the Connect To option to map a users home drive.  This way Win9x knows to upload the necessary registry hives to the server.
0
 
chicabowAuthor Commented:
I am unsure about the map a users home drive part.
Where and to what am I mapping to?
0
 
Neo_mvpsCommented:
You need to create a share for each user that will hold their personal settings.

Example:
You have a 4GB partition named HOME.  Within this partition you create a directory/share for each user of your organization.  Using the Connect To option from above you map the user to their personal home drive.

0
 
chicabowAuthor Commented:
OK I understand the creating a folder, so does that mean I just point to the folder?
0
 
chicabowAuthor Commented:
Adjusted points from 50 to 64
0
 
chicabowAuthor Commented:
Were gonna get this....
So I create this new folder for each user.
The connect part is still a bit confusing.
0

Featured Post

What does it mean to be "Always On"?

Is your cloud always on? With an Always On cloud you won't have to worry about downtime for maintenance or software application code updates, ensuring that your bottom line isn't affected.

  • 17
  • 12
  • 6
  • +1
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now