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open file pointers

Posted on 2000-04-06
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Last Modified: 2010-04-20
Is there a limit to how many file pointers can be opened on a linux box by a remote connection (or even on the box itself)?  If so, is there any way to change that number?
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Question by:visual032798
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munsie earned 100 total points
ID: 2692070
according to /usr/include/linux/limit.h, the limit is 256 per process.  This should include any file descriptors, pipes, and sockets.

but, with a quick little program that just opened up all of the files it could, I was able to open 1024 files at once.

This was done with the 2.2.14 kernel.

If you need more file descriptors, I would question your program's design, but the only way to change the limits is by changing the setting in the kernel source.  I didn't see anything obvious to change quickly scanning the kernel source, but it should be in there.

again, this is per process.  If you telnet in and start a 100 processes in the background, each process can have a 1024 files open.

good luck,
dennis
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