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C Shel script that search your home directory and re-organize

Posted on 2000-04-07
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Last Modified: 2010-04-21
How do you write a C Shell script that will search your home directory and re-organize it as follows:
1.  Place.java files in java directory.
2.  Place.class files in class directory.
3.  Place.cpp files in cplus2 directory.
4.  Place executables in execute directory.
5.  Place .txt  files in text directory.
6.  Place other files in others directory.

Your home directory should only contain these directories.  A file should be created with lines containing directoryname and number_of_files_per_ directory.  This file should be sorted by directory name.

Make sure that every .java file has its equivalent  .class file.

A statement of the UNIX name and version used.
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Question by:colekl
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3 Comments
 
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tfewster earned 40 total points
ID: 2694582
What qualification will I get if I complete this course for you?

Anyway, here's a rough top-down design, that you can complete & debug - Probably not up to classwork standards, but the principle will work if this is a genuine problem.

#!/usr/bin/csh
#(Path will depend on the Unix variant)

cd ~
 .
#Move files
foreach f in ( #list of .java files)
do
  #Move $f to java directory
done
 .
#etcetera
 .
# check .class files
foreach f in ( #list java directory )
do
  #strip off the extension (sed? awk?)
  #so f2 is the "main" filename
  if # test if class/$f2.class exists
  then
    # It exists, we're OK
  else
    # .class is missing;
    # What should we do?
  endif
done

#count the files in the subdirectories,
#now there's nothing left in the home #dir

for d in ( # list of directories )
# which gives us the sorted list :)
do
  echo $d >> /tmp/count
  #count the files in $d >> /tmp/count
done

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Author Comment

by:colekl
ID: 2694797
tfewster, I like your humor!
Thank you.
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LVL 21

Expert Comment

by:tfewster
ID: 2694875
Thank you - I feel guilty now, in case this WAS a course assignment (especially if you get a lousy grade for it).

One more "generic" tip anyway: Consider using "ls -1 ..." to generate the lists the "foreach" statements are using.
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