Solved

fips: finding more space

Posted on 2000-04-08
21
260 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-15
I've been trying to install linux for the first time (well.... 2nd if u count a umbdos install)
basically i've tried running fips but it will only let me create a 100mb or so partition max (the partition i want to split has over 2gb free).  How can I find more space?
I've defragged using the defrag program in win98 (1st edition).  It was not until I unchecked the rearrange program files.... option that I even got the option for a 100mb partition.  The windows swap file was also disabled for the duration of the attempt.
LBA is on if that effects anything.

How do I move that junk that is apparently cluttering up some sections nearby the end of the hard drive?

here's that debug file the program generated:
FIPS debug file

The command was: A:\FIPS.EXE -d

Transcript of session:

FIPS version 2.0, Copyright (C) 1993/94 Arno Schaefer
    FAT32 Support Copyright (C) 1997 Gordon Chaffee

DO NOT use FIPS in a multitasking environment like Windows, OS/2, Desqview,
Novell Task manager or the Linux DOS emulator: boot from a DOS boot disk first.

If you use OS/2 or a disk compressor, read the relevant sections in FIPS.DOC.

FIPS comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY, see file COPYING for details
This is free software, and you are welcome to redistribute it
under certain conditions; again see file COPYING for details.

Press any Key

Registers after call to int 13h 08h (drive 80h):

   00       sc/cl    hd
al ah bl bh cl ch dl dh   si    di    cflgs flags
3F 00 3C 4B BF 0A 01 FE - 04 02 02 00 00 00 46 72


Geometry reported by BIOS:
523 cylinders, 255 heads, 63 sectors

Registers after call to int 13h 00h (drive 80h):

al ah bl bh cl ch dl dh   si    di    cflgs flags
01 00 3C 4B BF 0A 80 FE - 04 02 02 00 00 00 46 72


Root sector drive 80h:

33 C0 8E D0 BC 00 7C FB - 50 07 50 1F FC BE 1B 7C
BF 1B 06 50 57 B9 E5 01 - F3 A4 CB BE BE 07 B1 04
38 2C 7C 09 75 15 83 C6 - 10 E2 F5 CD 18 8B 14 8B
EE 83 C6 10 49 74 16 38 - 2C 74 F6 BE 10 07 4E AC
3C 00 74 FA BB 07 00 B4 - 0E CD 10 EB F2 89 46 25
96 8A 46 04 B4 06 3C 0E - 74 11 B4 0B 3C 0C 74 05
3A C4 75 2B 40 C6 46 25 - 06 75 24 BB AA 55 50 B4
41 CD 13 58 72 16 81 FB - 55 AA 75 10 F6 C1 01 74
0B 8A E0 88 56 24 C7 06 - A1 06 EB 1E 88 66 04 BF
0A 00 B8 01 02 8B DC 33 - C9 83 FF 05 7F 03 8B 4E
25 03 4E 02 CD 13 72 29 - BE 46 07 81 3E FE 7D 55
AA 74 5A 83 EF 05 7F DA - 85 F6 75 83 BE 27 07 EB
8A 98 91 52 99 03 46 08 - 13 56 0A E8 12 00 5A EB
D5 4F 74 E4 33 C0 CD 13 - EB B8 00 00 81 41 49 03
56 33 F6 56 56 52 50 06 - 53 51 BE 10 00 56 8B F4
50 52 B8 00 42 8A 56 24 - CD 13 5A 58 8D 64 10 72
0A 40 75 01 42 80 C7 02 - E2 F7 F8 5E C3 EB 74 49
6E 76 61 6C 69 64 20 70 - 61 72 74 69 74 69 6F 6E
20 74 61 62 6C 65 00 45 - 72 72 6F 72 20 6C 6F 61
64 69 6E 67 20 6F 70 65 - 72 61 74 69 6E 67 20 73
79 73 74 65 6D 00 4D 69 - 73 73 69 6E 67 20 6F 70
65 72 61 74 69 6E 67 20 - 73 79 73 74 65 6D 00 00
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 - 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 - 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
00 00 00 8B FC 1E 57 8B - F5 CB 00 00 00 00 00 00
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 - 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 - 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 - 00 00 00 00 00 00 80 01
01 00 0C EF BF 2C 3F 00 - 00 00 91 81 80 00 00 00
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 - 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 - 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 - 00 00 00 00 00 00 55 AA


Partition table:

     |        |     Start      |      |      End       | Start  |Number of|
Part.|bootable|Head Cyl. Sector|System|Head Cyl. Sector| Sector |Sectors  |  MB
-----+--------+----------------+------+----------------+--------+---------+----
1    |    yes |   1    0      1|   0Ch| 239  556     63|      63|  8421777|4112
2    |     no |   0    0      0|   00h|   0    0      0|       0|        0|   0
3    |     no |   0    0      0|   00h|   0    0      0|       0|        0|   0
4    |     no |   0    0      0|   00h|   0    0      0|       0|        0|   0

Checking root sector ...
Info: Partition table inconsistency

FIPS has detected that the 'physical' start or end sector (head/cylinder/
sector) do not match with the 'logical' start/end sector. This is not
an error since the 'physical' values are redundant and not used anyway.
There are many configurations where the values differ. This message is
meant only to inform you that FIPS has adapted the 'physical' values
according to the current drive geometry. So don't be alarmed by an unex-
pected cylinder range.

Press any key

Partition table adapted to the current drive geometry:

     |        |     Start      |      |      End       | Start  |Number of|
Part.|bootable|Head Cyl. Sector|System|Head Cyl. Sector| Sector |Sectors  |  MB
-----+--------+----------------+------+----------------+--------+---------+----
1    |    yes |   1    0      1|   0Ch|  59  524     63|      63|  8421777|4112
2    |     no |   0    0      0|   00h|   0    0      0|       0|        0|   0
3    |     no |   0    0      0|   00h|   0    0      0|       0|        0|   0
4    |     no |   0    0      0|   00h|   0    0      0|       0|        0|   0

Warning: Partition does not end on cylinder boundary: partition 1

All partitions should end on a cylinder boundary

Press any key
OK

Press any Key

Boot sector drive 80h, partition 1:

EB 58 90 4D 53 57 49 4E - 34 2E 31 00 02 08 20 00
02 00 00 00 00 F8 00 00 - 3F 00 F0 00 3F 00 00 00
91 81 80 00 11 20 00 00 - 00 00 00 00 02 00 00 00
01 00 06 00 00 00 00 00 - 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
80 00 29 03 0B 6D 05 4E - 4F 20 4E 41 4D 45 20 20
20 20 46 41 54 33 32 20 - 20 20 FA 33 C9 8E D1 BC
F8 7B 8E C1 BD 78 00 C5 - 76 00 1E 56 16 55 BF 22
05 89 7E 00 89 4E 02 B1 - 0B FC F3 A4 8E D9 BD 00
7C C6 45 FE 0F 8B 46 18 - 88 45 F9 38 4E 40 7D 25
8B C1 99 BB 00 07 E8 97 - 00 72 1A 83 EB 3A 66 A1
1C 7C 66 3B 07 8A 57 FC - 75 06 80 CA 02 88 56 02
80 C3 10 73 ED BF 02 00 - 83 7E 16 00 75 45 8B 46
1C 8B 56 1E B9 03 00 49 - 40 75 01 42 BB 00 7E E8
5F 00 73 26 B0 F8 4F 74 - 1D 8B 46 32 33 D2 B9 03
00 3B C8 77 1E 8B 76 0E - 3B CE 73 17 2B F1 03 46
1C 13 56 1E EB D1 73 0B - EB 27 83 7E 2A 00 77 03
E9 FD 02 BE 7E 7D AC 98 - 03 F0 AC 84 C0 74 17 3C
FF 74 09 B4 0E BB 07 00 - CD 10 EB EE BE 81 7D EB
E5 BE 7F 7D EB E0 98 CD - 16 5E 1F 66 8F 04 CD 19
41 56 66 6A 00 52 50 06 - 53 6A 01 6A 10 8B F4 60
80 7E 02 0E 75 04 B4 42 - EB 1D 91 92 33 D2 F7 76
18 91 F7 76 18 42 87 CA - F7 76 1A 8A F2 8A E8 C0
CC 02 0A CC B8 01 02 8A - 56 40 CD 13 61 8D 64 10
5E 72 0A 40 75 01 42 03 - 5E 0B 49 75 B4 C3 03 18
01 27 0D 0A 49 6E 76 61 - 6C 69 64 20 73 79 73 74
65 6D 20 64 69 73 6B FF - 0D 0A 44 69 73 6B 20 49
2F 4F 20 65 72 72 6F 72 - FF 0D 0A 52 65 70 6C 61
63 65 20 74 68 65 20 64 - 69 73 6B 2C 20 61 6E 64
20 74 68 65 6E 20 70 72 - 65 73 73 20 61 6E 79 20
6B 65 79 0D 0A 00 00 00 - 49 4F 20 20 20 20 20 20
53 59 53 4D 53 44 4F 53 - 20 20 20 53 59 53 7E 01
00 57 49 4E 42 4F 4F 54 - 20 53 59 53 00 00 55 AA


Boot sector:

Bytes per sector: 512
Sectors per cluster: 8
Reserved sectors: 32
Number of FATs: 2
Number of rootdirectory entries: 0
Number of sectors (short): 0
Media descriptor byte: F8h
Sectors per FAT: 8209
Sectors per track: 63
Drive heads: 240
Hidden sectors: 63
Number of sectors (long): 8421777
Physical drive number: 80h
Signature: 29h

Calculated Partition Characteristica:

Start of FAT 1: 32
Start of FAT 2: 8241
Start of Rootdirectory: 16450
Start of Data: 16450
Number of Clusters: 1050663
Checking boot sector ...
Warning: Number of drive heads incorrect: 240 instead of 255

The number of drive heads in the boot sector does not match the actual
drive geometry reported by the BIOS
Do you want to correct this (y/n) n
OK
Checking FAT ... OK
Searching for free space ... OK

Do you want to make a backup copy of your root and boot sector before
proceeding (y/n)? y
Do you have a bootable floppy disk in drive A: as described in the
documentation (y/n)? y

Writing file a:\rootboot.001

Enter start cylinder for new partition (512 - 524):

Use the cursor keys to choose the cylinder, <enter> to continue

Old partition      Cylinder       New Partition


Bye!
0
Comment
Question by:Aikema
  • 11
  • 10
21 Comments
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:Aikema
Comment Utility
basically if i wipe out the existing filesystem i'm toast.... *sighs*
would make it a lot easier
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
Comment Utility
What's on the drive right now (windows with fat32 or NT?) and how big is it supposed to be. By the drive geometry reported I make it to be a 4Gb drive, correct?
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
Comment Utility
Never mind about the OS question, I just missed it in the first couple of lines of that very large question. I suspect that fips can't deal with something that win98 does. What version are you using, the 2.0 version is at http://metalab.unc.edu/pub/Linux/system/install/
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:Aikema
Comment Utility
Transcript of session:

FIPS version 2.0, Copyright (C) 1993/94 Arno Schaefer
    FAT32 Support Copyright (C) 1997 Gordon Chaffee
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:Aikema
Comment Utility
and yup... 4 gb
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
Comment Utility
Rats, I was hoping that it was the 1.5 version and there'd be an easy fix. Oh well... My guess is that you'll need to use a more sophisticated partition tool, like Partition Magic. It's a bit pricey for a single use (~$60 the last time I looked) and you could buy a 4-10 gig drive for not much more ($80-110). Your only other option would be to backup data from the win98 system and reinstall to a smaller partition.

On thought, but it's probably a long shot. Have you run scandisk on the drive (preferrably from a floppy or a "safe mode boot" to avoid trashing the file system)? Maybe there's something "not-quite-right" with the win98 filesystem.
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:Aikema
Comment Utility
there are no errors with the drive according to scandisk.... yes did a surface scan as well

scandisk still shows a bit of data in some of the last clusters in the drive even after defragging in windows.  is there some other defrag program around with fat32 support that i could try?
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:Aikema
Comment Utility
i've also given a couple of other programs a shot to no avail:
Partition Resizer
and Ranish Partition Manger
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
Comment Utility
None that I know of that we've not already mentioned. I there was any way to figure out that those frags are part of you could simply "copy the file".

Sudden thought... Are you running the defrag from a disk boot or from a win98 floppy. It could be that those frags are part of a system file that is locked while the system is running.
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:Aikema
Comment Utility
i'm running the defrag out of the windows gui.... can't find a version i can boot off a floppy..... that's why i'm looking for some options like that

i sorta figured it could be a locked up system file....
of course the prob is that i can't just grab a copy off some old dos disks b/c they don't support fat32
0
Enabling OSINT in Activity Based Intelligence

Activity based intelligence (ABI) requires access to all available sources of data. Recorded Future allows analysts to observe structured data on the open, deep, and dark web.

 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
Comment Utility
I might have found a clue, but it's not entirely clear how to apply it... From the "Partition Manager" FAQ:

"Note: DEFRAG moves all files to the beginning of the partition, but it leaves system and hidden files untouched. Therefore even after you run DEFRAG there still might be files at the end of partition. In this case you would have to find those files and remove system and hidden attributes, then defragment the disk again and after that restore those attributes."
 
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:Aikema
Comment Utility
is there any quick and easy way to find all those hidden files?
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
Comment Utility
I was thinking of that when I said, "but it's not entirely clear how to apply it". I can't think of any way to just see either hidden or system files...

Disregard the previous, I just figured it out. You can see only system or hidden files with "dir /AS /S" or "dir /AH /S", respectively. Seems to me the way to do it would be to redirect the output into files (dir /AH /S >hidden.fil, dir /AS /S >system.fil) and then turn them into batch files to remove/restore the attribute.
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:Aikema
Comment Utility
ok.... i defragged using perfectdisk 2000 (which shoved the data to opposing ends of the drive)... then turned off the swap file and booted into safe mode and ran the windows defrag....
booted off a floppy and ran fips... managed to split off 784 mb or so

just hoping that's repeatable
*crosses his fingers*

i doubt it... but then again i'm gettin' desparate for a solution
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
Comment Utility
I think we probably know what's going on now and I think you'll ultimately get there. Consider that only a little while ago you could only get 100Mb...
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:Aikema
Comment Utility
success.... now on to my next round of problems..... setting up all my devices in linux
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
Comment Utility
What devices, what problems?
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:Aikema
Comment Utility
sound card (kinda doubt it'll work... crystal soundfusion), and a nic (network everywhere nc100 fast ethernet pci)
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
Comment Utility
I think we are working those now in another question, right?

Are we through with this question now?
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:Aikema
Comment Utility
yup.. i guess so

u want the points?
0
 
LVL 40

Accepted Solution

by:
jlevie earned 200 total points
Comment Utility
Well.. pretty please... and thank you...

I guess the points & the recognition that results is one of the motivations for being an "expert" here. The other, in my mind, is just being able to help (sometimes in a small way) others solve problems.
0

Featured Post

How to run any project with ease

Manage projects of all sizes how you want. Great for personal to-do lists, project milestones, team priorities and launch plans.
- Combine task lists, docs, spreadsheets, and chat in one
- View and edit from mobile/offline
- Cut down on emails

Join & Write a Comment

Using 'screen' for session sharing, The Simple Edition Step 1: user starts session with command: screen Step 2: other user (logged in with same user account) connects with command: screen -x Done. Both users are connected to the same CLI sessio…
It’s 2016. Password authentication should be dead — or at least close to dying. But, unfortunately, it has not traversed Quagga stage yet. Using password authentication is like laundering hotel guest linens with a washboard — it’s Passé.
Learn how to get help with Linux/Unix bash shell commands. Use help to read help documents for built in bash shell commands.: Use man to interface with the online reference manuals for shell commands.: Use man to search man pages for unknown command…
Learn how to find files with the shell using the find and locate commands. Use locate to find a needle in a haystack.: With locate, check if the file still exists.: Use find to get the actual location of the file.:

744 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

15 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now