Win 2000 / Linux Dual-Boot

Is there any way to create a dual-boot system with win 2000 & linux???????????????
zzASLANzzAsked:
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ftownConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Either one will be happy to take over the dual boot control.  Just decide which  one you want to do this and install it last.  Be sure to have seperate partitions for each operating systems.  The best thing is to create a data partition that both operating systems understand and point all data generating programs that may share date between the two operating systems to it.  That would be in addition to the other partitions required by both systems.
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zzASLANzzAuthor Commented:
Adjusted points from 200 to 250
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zzASLANzzAuthor Commented:
How about this added to the mix.  I also want a Win98 partition just for games.  Now, I know commercial software like BootMagic doesn't support Win2K.  I currently have a dual-boot with 98 & linux.  Lilo controls the booting.  I wasn't sure if trying to install 2000 will screw things up now.  So you are saying that if I install 2000 now (last), then 2000 will do the booting?  Where do I configure the boot menu in 2000 or does it just find the other installs???
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MorescaCommented:
Installing Win2000 last should automatically allow for all of the previously installed OS's to be installed in the 2000 Boot Loader.  The worst case scenario would be that you `might' have to create the Linux loader image using the `dd' command and editing the boot.ini file to reflect that for the Linux entry.  You really shouldn't have any problems, however.
Best of luck.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
It's easy to dual boot - heck, I run 6 operating systems on my notebook (and intend to install a 7th).

Currently, I'm using System Commander 3.0 to handle the booting, but You can accomplish the same (excluding Win95) without buying a current version of system commander - though it is easy and if money ($50) isn't an issue, I'd strongly recommend using it instead.

Just so you know, my notebook can boot between:
Windows 95
Windows 98 SE
Windows NT Server 4.0
Windows 2000 Advanced Server
BeOS 4.5
Red Hat Linux 6.1

And I intend to install DOS 6.22 (I'm a consultant and I like having access to all popular OSs readily available if I'm at a client's)
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LermitteCommented:
Dual-Booting NT and Linux
The growing popularity of Linux has created a new generation of users who want to run their favorite Linux distribution side by side with NT. LILO, the Linux Loader, handles Linux's boot management. Although you can use tricks to make LILO boot to NT's boot loader, most Linux users who implement Linux and NT multiboot systems use a third-party management utility or a LILO option in NT's boot loader.

To implement a Linux and NT multiboot configuration, install Linux on the partition of your choice and install LILO in the first sector of the Linux partition (i.e., the superblock) rather than in the MBR. If you load LILO into the MBR, you'll overwrite the NT boot sector and disable the boot loader. After you install LILO, you need to tie it to NT's boot loader menu by creating a Linux boot sector file (many users prefer to call this file bootsect.lnx, but NT and Linux don't require that name) and adding a reference to this file in the boot.ini file. A dual-boot NT and Linux system's boot.ini [Operating Systems] section might look like

[Operating Systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition
  (1)\winnt="Windows NT
Workstation 4.0"
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition
  (1)\winnt="Windows NT
  Workstation 4.0 [VGA mode]"
  /basevideo /sos
C:\bootsect.lnx="Linux"


You can use Linux's dd utility or a similar utility to create a Linux boot sector file, then manually add the boot sector file to boot.ini. However, a simpler method is to use Gilles Vollant Software's BootPart 2.20, a utility that creates the boot sector file and automatically adds the entry to boot.ini. For more information about the BootPart utility, see the sidebar "BootPart Enhances NT's Boot Loader" and "Multibooting Resources."

You must create a new copy of bootsect.lnx every time you modify the boot sector of your Linux partition (e.g., when you install a new kernel with LILO). If you're implementing a multiboot NT and Linux system, I recommend that you read the Linux-related articles listed in "Multibooting Resources."

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zzASLANzzAuthor Commented:
Thanks to everyone for their comments.
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