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Taking a DeskTop Computer from Australia [240V] to Philippines [120V]

  Please advise what problems could I expect in taking a Celeron DeskTop 466Mhz Computer from the above country to country. I am staying in the Philippines for a year of more.
   Would I need to replace the Internal Power Supply or use an External Transformer of some kind.
   If I changed the Power Supply "as an example", would any future Philippine components installed work with the Australian Computer components [Re: Voltages], Eg CPu, HD, CdRom Etc.   Bottom line, would this be a practical exercise. Regards Morota
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morota
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morota
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1 Solution
 
pjknibbsCommented:
Look at the back of the power supply. Most have a switch which allows you to toggle between 110/120V and 230/240V operation. If you have such a switch, the computer should work OK--if it doesn't, you'd have to source a local power supply.

As for the other stuff, these things run at the same DC voltages worldwide--it's the job of the power supply to provide these fixed DC voltages. Therefore any component you buy in the Phillipines will work fine in your system, although the driver disks and instruction manuals may not be in English!
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RoadWarriorCommented:
All the internals will be fine, apart from as noted the actual PSU unless you have a switchable one. Things to watch out for will be external components like speakers and printers which will probably have tranformer based wall adapters which will be voltage specific. Also the monitor may not work on another voltage (some have switchmode autosense 90-300V 45-70hz PSUs, but a lot don't)

Beware, purchasing a "replacement" adapter for external equipment from the manufacturer/distributor for the local voltage, may cost as much as the equipment originally cost you! (especially if you bought the equipment at a discount) If it uses something friendly like 9vDC 500mA then electronics stores will have a generic adapter to use, but some things (external modems are usually odd creatures for power requirement) may want something like 15V AC @ 1.5Amps, which would be hard to source.

regards,

Road Warrior
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RoadWarriorCommented:
Oh yes, modems, internal or external, you may be needing a different kind of cable to connect them, also you may have to change some settings in the modem's firmware so they use the right kind of tones to dial. This is usually done by issuing some special "AT" commands to the modem. This is model specific so you either need to refer to your manual or contact the manufacturer ( a rare few have their modems complete command set on the web)

Road Warrior
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arokiaCommented:
Also, you may experience irregular power supply from the power company. You would be safe if you connect yr pc to a ups. you should be able to purchase a good one locally.
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1cellCommented:
other than what has been mentioned, have you looked into customs?  I don't know what it's like for people carrying computers across borders but I know when we ship them or receive them across borders, it's very expensive.
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redenCommented:
morota:

1cell is correct its better to leave you computer and buy one unit here in the Philippines for around 30KPHP. Just sell your unit upon leaving. We have a weekly magazine (buy&sell - which you can advertise for free) to help you sell the unit. Or if you want I can take good care of it.

(we have 220V here and 240V are working fine in fact all of our computers here in the office are of 240V)
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emery800Commented:
I do not know what Australia has for voltage, however, we have 60 cycle and a lot of other countries like Scotland have 50 cycle. You might visit your manufacturers web site and see if they address this type of question. Your computer and accessories are probably worth something now if you use them without researching this (which is great that you are doing it now) then they will not be worth much. Components used now are pretty sensitive compared to years ago when tubes existed! Darn it almost let you know how old I was. Ha Ha! Later Dave
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pjknibbsCommented:
emery800: Frequency shouldn't really make a difference, since the power supply rectifies the AC to DC anyway. Assuming it's using a simple diode bridge to do this (and there's no earthly reason why it shouldn't) the frequency is irrelevant until you start getting so fast the diodes can't switch, and that's in the radiofrequency range!
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christalnetCommented:
look the best thing to do is to wait untill you get there take a look at what is available and almost any electronic store can help with any adapters or fittings you need if you go thru all this here you will most certainly buy a bunch of stuff you will not need
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ViRoyCommented:
computers do have industry standards as most parts are not made in the united states. you can always goto any other country and expect to find the correct parts for your computer... HOWEVER..
i dont know about the phillipines but in some countrys their wall sockets for power, are different from our 2 prong plug.

this does not mean that you will need a different power supply though, you can get a converter cable for any type of plug... if their power is different from americas 120v, you can set your power supply accordingly with the selector switch on the back.

other than that you will be fine :)
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1cellCommented:
Viroy, is it in your habit to go to questions which have been in process for a good time and answer them with comments which are at best guesses and do not provide any more help than anyone elses comments?

You are not new here, you are just a pain to all the people who try to make this site helpful and professional.  I for one, though I know I speak for many, would appreciate it if you could conform to the protocol at this site in the interest of helping each questioner instead of simple point gain.
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emery800Commented:
If you do what Viroy recommended (and submitted as answer in lieu of a comment) I think you will have a :( instead of a :). Later Dave
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