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why errors from Excel object

Posted on 2000-04-17
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Last Modified: 2010-05-02
The following command:

    Dim ef1 As New ExcelFile

gives me the error:

    User defined type not defined.

I added the excel library 8.0.  It worked on a different computer using the 9.0 library.  should I be adding more components or references? and what is the different between 8.0 and 9.0?
Thanks
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Question by:cocor
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9 Comments
 
LVL 70

Expert Comment

by:Éric Moreau
ID: 2724158
This type doesn't exist in the 8.0 version!
0
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:Glen Richmond
ID: 2724933
try
dim xl As Excel.Application
xl.Workbooks.Open "PathAndFileNameAsString"
this should offer up most properties and methods used.
0
 
LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:TheMek
ID: 2726005
The way glenrichmond put it is the way to do it, but you have to declare it like this:
Dim xl as New Excel.Application

If you don't you'd have to set the xl variable later on, which is not what you'd want.

Greetings,
  Erwin
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LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:Glen Richmond
ID: 2726585
Yeh sorry TheMek missed that out, well spotted.
0
 

Author Comment

by:cocor
ID: 2726808
So the proper way to declare an excel file that will work in both excel library 8.0 and 9.0 is this?:

dim xl As New Excel.Application
xl.Workbooks.Open "PathFileNameAsString"

if i don't put "new" will it open an existing excel file or it is declaring the variable xl as a new excel object?

where can i find a list of these methods you mention?
ie.  xl.Cells(R, C).Value =...
       
0
 
LVL 70

Accepted Solution

by:
Éric Moreau earned 50 total points
ID: 2726902
If you don't put the "New", you need a syntax like this:
dim xl As Excel.Application
set xl = new Excel.Application
-or-
set xl=CreateObject("Excel.Application")

Try not to put the New on the declaration line.

"where can i find a list of these methods you mention? "
You may look the help file but an easy way I find command of Excel, Word, ... is to record macros!
0
 

Author Comment

by:cocor
ID: 2727614
Thankyou for all your help.  This is what I was looking for
0
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:Glen Richmond
ID: 2728835
cocor just a quick question why did you choose his answer over mine?
0
 

Author Comment

by:cocor
ID: 2731541
I am sorry. I wasn't sure which one to choose.

I knew how to declare an excel object both ways.  I just didn't know exactly what was happening and what was the difference between both types of declarations.  I guess the answer I was looking for was an understanding of the commands and what was the difference of the 8.0 and 9.0

I hope there is no hard feelings.
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