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Sony TSL-9000 Autoloader and SCO

Posted on 2000-04-18
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Has anyone ever setup an autoloader tape drive unit in SCO Unix.  If so, is this done through the backup software rather that the OS?  Is there a way to get the OS to recognized that the TBU exists before the backup software is loaded?
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Question by:jhagander
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by:tfewster
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Not in SCO, but in HP-UX & Solaris: There are two logical components, the tape drive and the Autoloader/robot, with logically seperate interfaces.

The drive is treated as a normal tape drive by the OS - If there's a tape in it, you can use mt, dd etc. to access the tape.

The backup software will schedule backups, track what tapes the backups are on and make the appropriate tape available, but will then make OS calls to do the backups/restores.
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tfewster earned 100 total points
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As you haven't responded, I'll assume my comments answered your question :)
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