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Telnet & root...

Posted on 2000-04-19
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722 Views
Last Modified: 2008-02-01
Hello,

I can access to my UNIX server using
Telnet and my account.
When I type 'su root' and my password
the answer is : Sorry

I use to work on Linux and I never had
this problem.

Any idea ??

Thanx,
WW
0
Comment
Question by:wwalschaerts
6 Comments
 
LVL 15

Expert Comment

by:samri
ID: 2730078
wwalschaerts,

 su root will require you to enter the password for root, and not your password.  

As per Solaris 7 man page
--
    The su  command allows one to become  another  user  without
     logging off. The default user name is root (super user).

     To use su  ,  the  appropriate  password  must  be  supplied
     (unless  the  invoker  is  already root). If the password is
     correct, su  creates a new shell process that has  the  real
     and  effective  user  ID, group IDs, and supplementary group
     list set to those of the specified username. The  new  shell
     will be the shell specified in the shell field of username's ...
---

most likely in your previous sytem, the password for root is the same as your login password.  Please double check the password you entered against the root password and try again.


good luck
0
 

Accepted Solution

by:
bsher earned 100 total points
ID: 2730084
have u include urself into root's group
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:raghurani
ID: 2730348
Hi WW,

  I agree with samri. If his solution does not work, then,
  think giving my suggestion a try.  

  Please check the contents of /etc/default/security file.
  SU_ROOT_GROUP variable may block you from using "su".

  Following is a piece of manual from "man 4 security" :

---------

SU_ROOT_GROUP
        This parameter defines the root group name for the su
        command.  Refer to su(1).
        SU_ROOT_GROUP=group_name The root group name is set to
         the specified symbolic group name.  The su command
         enforces the restriction that a non-superuser must be a
        member of the specified root group in order to be
        allowed to su to root.  This does not alter password
        checking.

        Default value: If this parameter is not defined or if
         it is commented out, there is no default value.  In
         this case, a non superuser is allowed to su to root
         without being bound by root group restrictions.


------------

good luck :))

-- Raghu
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LVL 15

Expert Comment

by:samri
ID: 2730398
ww,

  just curious,  what variant of UNIX you are running?


-
0
 

Author Comment

by:wwalschaerts
ID: 2730433
Hum... I don't have default directory
in /etc. I have it in my Linux machine
only. I have had a look just for curiosity.

I cant find any security file having the
parameter you mentionned.

For info, the version installed is
true64 v4 on Alpha system

WW
0
 

Author Comment

by:wwalschaerts
ID: 2733562
Right ! It was not a setting problem.
You put me on the track :
My account was not part of SYSTEM
group.

Thanx.
WW
0

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