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Error converting FoxPro 2.5 database to Access 2000

Posted on 2000-04-19
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Last Modified: 2011-10-03
I'm a novice still seeking advice. Can anyone tell me how to convert (or update) an old FoxPro DBF I'm having trouble with? I'm not sure what the probelem is. I'm helping out my in-laws trying to fix their database program that went down because of Y2K. It's a stand-alone DOS Record Keeping program that is set for a small office network. The front screen says, "FoxPro 2.5 exe Support Library (X)."

First and foremost, it needs to be made Y2K compliant. Secondly, it needs to be updated from a DOS shell to a Windows app. They do not have the FoxPro 2.5 program per se, just the stand-alone database program that apparently was created by it. At the moment I am having trouble trying to open or convert the DBF files in Access 2000 for them. Could this be a locked database?

Here's what I get when I ty to open the file or convert to Access 2000... (all rookie stuff I'm sure)

1) IMPORTING THE FILE FOXUSER.DBF WITH ACCESS:

I go to FILE... GET EXTERNAL DATA... and then IMPORT... I get an error message that says, "Access was not able to perform this operation because the project is not connected to a SQL server database."

2) DOUBLE-CLICKING ON THE FILE FOXUSER.DBF:

"Unrecognized database format"

3) OPENING THE FOXUSER.DBF FILE IN ACCESS 2000:

I go to FILE... OPEN... then select the file FOXUSER.DBF. I get two diferent errors that say...

"Cannot locate the requested xbase memo file"

"Microsoft Access can't open the table in Datasheet view"

The MS Knowledge Base says, "You tried to access a dBASE (.dbf) file, but the file's associated memo (.dbt) file could not be found. Make sure the .dbt files is in the same directory as the .dbf file, and then try the operation again."


Okay, I told you up front, I am a novice. I'm certain this is apparent by now. <g> I've only done ONE Access database in my life and have been kind of pushed into this in an effort to help out one of my in-laws. I would like to find the easiest way to get their database Y2K compliant, plus put it into a newer Windows program like Access 2000 if possible. The trick is, if I use Access 2000 how do I get the old DBF files to import?

I would sure appreciate any input on this one. It may be a very simple fix for most of you, I really don't know. What I do know is that I'm over my head in helping out the inlaws.  :o(

Last but not least... if they were to purchase the New Visual FoxPro 6.0, wouldn't that update everything much easier? I assumed at first blush that it would be a normal version upgrade but the folks at Microsoft actually said it would probably be better in Access now. The data being handled is nothing extraordinary, just simple PIM, billing and time tracking stuff. I am hoping for a quick easy conversion that can be made Y2K compliant and runs on a new Windows app like Access 2000 or maybe even Visual FoxPro 6.0. (Easier said than done?)

Is any of this possible at all???

Thanks for any advice!  :o)

PS... I don't know about the points well enough to know if this is easy or hard. I suspect easy but please tell me.

timwatts@mm.com


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Question by:timwatts041300
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Expert Comment

by:paasky
ID: 2731837
Hello timwatts,

The problem is Access 2000 doesn't support FoxPro importing/linking so you need to create ODBC entry for your FoxPro database with Microsoft ODBC Administrator. After that use Get External Data | Import and choose filetype ODBC. Next dialog will ask you what ODBC DSN you want to use, you should select your FoxPro entry...

Here are MS KB instructions:

ACC2000: No Option to Import, Link, or Export to the FoxPro File Type

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The information in this article applies to:

Microsoft Access 2000

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
This article applies only to a Microsoft Access database (.mdb).

Moderate: Requires basic macro, coding, and interoperability skills.



SYMPTOMS
In the Import, Export, and Link dialog boxes in Microsoft Access 2000, FoxPro is not listed as an option for file type.



CAUSE
The Microsoft FoxPro ISAM driver is no longer included with Microsoft Access.



RESOLUTION
To import from, link to, and export to Microsoft FoxPro, use the Visual FoxPro ODBC driver, as demonstrated in the following steps.

Import from FoxPro
Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.


In Control Panel, open the ODBC Data Sources (32-bit) tool, and add a new ODBC Data Source for your FoxPro database or tables by selecting the appropriate Microsoft Visual FoxPro driver.


Open the Access database that you want to import into.


On the File menu, point to Get External Data, and then click Import.


In the Import dialog box, click ODBC Databases in the Files of type list.


In the Select Data Source dialog box, select the Visual FoxPro data source that you created in step 2, and then click OK.


In the Import Objects dialog box, select the tables that you want to import, and then click OK.


Link to FoxPro
Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.


In Control Panel, open the ODBC Data Sources (32-bit) tool and add a new ODBC Data Source for your FoxPro database or tables by selecting the appropriate Microsoft Visual FoxPro driver.


Open the Access database that you want to create the link in.


On the File menu, point to Get External Data, and then click Link Tables.


In the Link dialog box, click ODBC Databases in the Files of type list.


In the Select Data Source dialog box, select the Visual FoxPro data source that you created in step 2, and then click OK.


In the Link Tables dialog box, select the tables that you want to import, and then click OK.


Export to FoxPro
Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.


In Control Panel, open the ODBC Data Sources (32-bit) tool and add a new ODBC Data Source for your FoxPro database or tables by selecting the appropriate Microsoft Visual FoxPro driver.


Open the Access database that you want to export from.


On the File menu, click Export.


In the Export Table 'tablename' To dialog box, click ODBC Databases in the Files of type list.


In the Export dialog box, type the name of the new table, and then click OK.


In the Select Data Source dialog box, select the Visual FoxPro data source that you created in step 2, and then click OK.





MORE INFORMATION
Access to FoxPro data through the Microsoft Jet database engine was provided in earlier versions of Microsoft Access and earlier versions of the Microsoft Jet database engine. However, with Access 2000, access to Microsoft FoxPro data is possible only through the Microsoft Visual FoxPro ODBC driver. Access to FoxPro data through the Microsoft Jet database engine is no longer supported.

Steps to Reproduce Behavior
Open any Access database.


On the File menu, point to Get External Data, and then click Import.


In the Import dialog box, click the Files of type list.


Note that FoxPro is not there.



REFERENCES
For more information about setting up ODBC data sources, click Microsoft Access Help on the Help menu, type setup up ODBC data sources in the Office Assistant or the Answer Wizard, and then click Search to view the topic.

For information about converting databases that have linked FoxPro tables, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

Q200393 ACC2000: Linked FoxPro Icon Dimmed (Gray) in Converted Database
For additional information about issues you may encounter when importing, linking, and exporting FoxPro data, please click the article numbers below to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
Q237819 ACC2000: "ODBC Call Failed" Error Message Exporting to FoxPro
Q188401 PRB: ACCESS Cannot Import/Link Table if Index Contains Function

Additional query words: prb

Keywords : kbdta
Version : WINDOWS:2000
Platform : WINDOWS
Issue type : kbprb
 


Regards,
paasky
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Author Comment

by:timwatts041300
ID: 2738911
Edited text of question.
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Author Comment

by:timwatts041300
ID: 2738955
Edited text of question.
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Author Comment

by:timwatts041300
ID: 2738973
This answer so far seems to be incomplete. The ODBC instructions were not clear even though they were from Microsoft. I suspect there is more going on here than just the ODBC. I have edited and revised my question so as to clarify the problem. Hope it helps.
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Accepted Solution

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paasky earned 50 total points
ID: 2739500
I've MS Enterprise Edition which contains also FoxPro 6.0. I haven't installed FoxPro, but I'm quite sure it can convert/read your foxpro 2.5 database.

Also, if you like you can email your dbf tables to me (see address from my profile) and I can try to import them to Access database and send that to you.

Regards,
Paasky
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Expert Comment

by:paasky
ID: 2742193
Can you find out is there any memo field files (.dbt) in the hard drive or did you got the .dbf files by email and someone forgot to post them?
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Expert Comment

by:paasky
ID: 2787531
timwatts, how is your conversion going? Haven't heard anything from you in three weeks...
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Author Comment

by:timwatts041300
ID: 2889564
Comment accepted as answer
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Author Comment

by:timwatts041300
ID: 2889565
I was trying to avoid purchasing VFP 6.0 but it looks as though it is the only way to do this particular db. I acquiesce to the gentleman from Finland. Paasky knows best!  :o)


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