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CreateProcess & ShellExecute & WinExec??

Posted on 2000-04-24
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Last Modified: 2012-05-04
hi all,
I previously asked how to start a console application/ external application from a FORM and i have succeeded in doing this. My question now is :: Is it possible to manipulate where the window pops up and the size of the window. I have found nothing in the help menu that is in anyway informative. Can someone tell me how to do this?

I would have thought that there is simply some parameters i must set !!??!!

Thanks Liam

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Question by:Leo79
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nietod earned 100 total points
ID: 2743514
surprisingly, windows does not provide a direct way to do this.  The way you have to do so is to use FindWindow() or EnumWindows() to find the window handle of the console window you created.  (Windows does not provide a direct way to do this, I don't know why.)  Then once you have the window handle, you can use MoveWindow() to move the window where you want it.  (Or you can use other API functions to move it, hide it, maximize it, etc.)

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by:nietod
ID: 2743535
The following article from the VC help shows how to get a window handle from a console using FindWindow().
********************************
Obtaining a Console Window Handle (HWND)
Last reviewed: September 29, 1995
Article ID: Q124103  
The information in this article applies to:
Microsoft Win32 Application Programming Interface (API) included with:


    - Microsoft Windows NT versions 3.1 and 3.5
    - Microsoft Windows 95 version 4.0




SUMMARY
It may be useful to manipulate a window associated with a console application. The Win32 API provides no direct method for obtaining the window handle associated with a console application. However, you can obtain the window handle by calling FindWindow(). This function retrieves a window handle based on a class name or window name.

Call GetConsoleTitle() to determine the current console title. Then supply the current console title to FindWindow().



MORE INFORMATION
Because multiple windows may have the same title, you should change the current console window title to a unique title. This will help prevent the wrong window handle from being returned. Use SetConsoleTitle() to change the current console window title. Here is the process:


Call GetConsoleTitle() to save the current console window title.

Call SetConsoleTitle() to change the console title to a unique title.

Call Sleep(40) to ensure the window title was updated.

Call FindWindow(NULL, uniquetitle), to obtain the HWND this call returns the HWND -- or NULL if the operation failed.

Call SetConsoleTitle() with the value retrieved from step 1, to restore the original window title.

You should test the resulting HWND. For example, you can test to see if the returned HWND corresponds with the current process by calling GetWindowText() on the HWND and comparing the result with GetConsoleTitle().
The resulting HWND is not guaranteed to be suitable for all window handle operations.



Sample Code
The following function retrieves the current console application window handle (HWND). If the function succeeds, the return value is the handle of the console window. If the function fails, the return value is NULL. Some error checking is omitted, for brevity.

HWND GetConsoleHwnd(void) {

    #define MY_BUFSIZE 1024 // buffer size for console window titles
    HWND hwndFound;         // this is what is returned to the caller
    char pszNewWindowTitle[MY_BUFSIZE]; // contains fabricated WindowTitle
    char pszOldWindowTitle[MY_BUFSIZE]; // contains original WindowTitle

    // fetch current window title

    GetConsoleTitle(pszOldWindowTitle, MY_BUFSIZE);

    // format a "unique" NewWindowTitle

    wsprintf(pszNewWindowTitle,"%d/%d",
                GetTickCount(),
                GetCurrentProcessId());

    // change current window title

    SetConsoleTitle(pszNewWindowTitle);

    // ensure window title has been updated

    Sleep(40);

    // look for NewWindowTitle

    hwndFound=FindWindow(NULL, pszNewWindowTitle);

    // restore original window title

    SetConsoleTitle(pszOldWindowTitle);

    return(hwndFound);

}

*****************************
Let me know if you have any questions.
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Author Comment

by:Leo79
ID: 2745157
Thanks a Million,
The answer was perfect, even good enough for me to understand first time round. I have implement it and everything works the way i wanted it to.
Cheers Mate
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